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  #1  
Old 01-03-2017, 04:10 PM
OX1 OX1 is offline
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Default Have you driven a new or near new 430?

Just curious what it drove like. Mine still has a mid throttle stumbling issue, which I have only tackled the fuel side of so far (seems OK after rebuild, I have a lot of years experience with the Carters/Edelbrocks).

Anyway, just curious what I am shooting for. I assume with an open diff, she should do a one wheel peel virtually forever with the advertised stock torque.

But with over 4000 lbs, a 2.4 first gear and 2.9ish diff, maybe not??
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  #2  
Old 01-03-2017, 05:12 PM
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OMG Henry, so much has changed since the 430 was produced. Let's start with your rebuild...
Did you bore the cylinders and replace all eight pistons?
If so, did you use DOMED pistons like the originals, or did you replace with flat-top pistons? Flat pistons lose a ton of original compression ratio and a lot of HP.

Original pistons come in RH and LH sets of four and nobody makes them (due to low demand). Some piston manufacturers will cast a set for ~$1,200. Then, they must match your new larger bore size. Actually, I have that wrong. We match bore size to the new pistons. That is why all sizes of pistons are NOT available, all the time. To be safe, they stock +.040" (or larger) pistons because they should fit all overhaul jobs.

Next, we need to talk about modern fuel that was NOT designed to run in a 430. Gasohol will ruin your OEM valves and modern low ZDDP oil will ruin your cam. The only remedy I know of is to use hardened exhaust seats and valves that won't weld to the seats. Yes, you can buy lead additive. As for the ZDDP, most oil with a viscosity of 40 in the numbers will work or you can buy zinc and phosphorus additives.

I love Ford products but the 430 is THE hardest engine to rebuild simply because parts are not available or they cost way too much money. Your oil pump also includes a vacuum pump. Wonderful, but where can you find one? I suggest 430 owners find a good core 390 and build that. They can produce MUCH more HP than the 430 and parts are everywhere. Edelbrock makes aluminum heads with all modern goodies, and intake manifold that saves 100 pounds. Add a roller camshaft and run that engine another 250,000 miles on pump gas and modern oil.

RE: Hesitation... My experience with older engines is, their cam is retarded from a stretched timing chain. Normally, a new timing set will correct this. When I build a street engine I advance cam timing by at least four degrees to bring torque peaks down closer to low and mid range rpms. Of course after timing set wear, the offset will settle closer to zero advance.

To set things right and proper, we normally reference with respect to the crankshaft. So, advancing the cam will RETARD the crank timing. That means, when the #6 piston is at TDC on it's exhaust stroke and the rocker arms are dead level, crank timing should show four degrees BTDC. - Dave
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  #3  
Old 01-03-2017, 06:35 PM
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Funny you mention rebuild. I wasn't even thinking that, but the previous owner claims he did " rebuild" the engine.

My guess, maybe new rings/bearings, light hone, but who knows. I guess I could scope the cyl's and see if the original pistons are even still in it. Will check the chain too, now that you mention.

But anyway, back to my original question. If everything in this motor is up to snuff, all the parts are correct and not worn, shouldn't this motor shred tires almost instantly off idle?

I'm not looking to do burnout competitions, just trying to guage what power they had stock and how well it got to the ground.
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Old 01-04-2017, 02:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OX1 View Post
But anyway, back to my original question. If everything in this motor is up to snuff, all the parts are correct and not worn, shouldn't this motor shred tires almost instantly off idle?
YES!; well maybe not "shred", but certainly spin enough to please the tire companies!

My 1960 "J" code, with <80k on the odometer, all original (+ time & usage), with the selector in D1 (C.O.M. w/ 2.90:1 open rear) does the "one-wheel-peel" just fine.

The MEL Marauder series of engines was Ford Motor Company's "big gun" for 1958 and into 1959 (which they then pulled out of racing). The 430 cu. in. version was nick-named the "Bulldozer" due to the torque output and its' resulting performance. The top of the heap was the Super Marauder (J8 option) with aluminum intake and three dual venturi Holley 2300s rated at 400HP. This was the largest and most powerful (first to hit 400 hp) engine in the American car market at that time.

As far as being advised to remove the 430 MEL (if your vehicle is a "J" code unit, that in itself makes for a less common assembly), replacing with a 390 FE (although a good engine) because "it can produced MUCH more HP than the 430", well, this does not seem logical, and I would have to disagree.

Remember, friendly discussion, sometimes with opposing views, is the only way to discover all options.

Scott.
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Old 01-04-2017, 04:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbf777 View Post
...As far as being advised to remove the 430 MEL (if your vehicle is a "J" code unit, that in itself makes for a less common assembly), replacing with a 390 FE (although a good engine) because "it can produced MUCH more HP than the 430", well, this does not seem logical, and I would have to disagree...
Can you support this opinion?

The facts are;
  • Domed pistons for the 430 MEL are 'custom made' only whereas 390 pistons are very available in OEM, forged and hypereutectic alloys.
  • Many companies offer roller cam kits for the 390.
  • Edelbrock makes direct bolt-on aluminum heads for the 390/427 at a fair price. These heads already include stainless valves, bronze guides, Viton seals, hardened seats and helicoiled holes. They also feature a thick 5/8" deck for those who want to shave them.
  • Edelbrock makes a matching aluminum intake manifold which together with the aluminum heads, reduces 100 pounds weight and heat transfer is 4X faster than cast iron.
  • 390 engines are available all over the USA because Ford put them in just about every car and truck line of the day.
  • Yes, the 390 can easily outperform the 430 on many levels including; aftermarket support, availability, cost savings and HP. Remember, Ford Racing offers a 427, based on the 351Windsor. It produces over 500HP and over 500 ft/lbs torque. This 'across the counter' engine is naturally aspirated, runs on modern fuel, modern oil and it weighs less than 600 pounds.

I respect the 430 MEL but like the Chevy 409, it is an obsolete dinosaur that nobody supports. Aside from making your car a 'garage or trailer queen' when your 352 or 430 gets old and tired, keep it on an engine stand for the next owner, in case he wants to rebuild it. Meanwhile, hunt down a 390 and rebuild it to operate on modern liquids.

If there is a more viable alternative to bring the 430 back to original glory I would love to hear it. - Dave
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Old 01-04-2017, 05:11 PM
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I like the uniqueness and conversation piece of the 430 and I don't honestly think it needs a rebuild. Fires right up cold, no valve guide/seal smoke. Idles perfect, cold or hot.

Runs very strong until about half throttle. Leaks out of a lot of places, but I already planned for a re-gasket at some point. Anyway, I think it is timing or maybe the chain (or both).

That said, IF I was going to replace 430 (I'm not, I would rebuild, no matter the cost), it would be a BB/C6 combo. I already have a mildly built BB and a ton of 4WD known good C6's kicking around. Even with just a mild BB, it's hard for FE to economically make up for 70-80 cube loss.

Appreciate the info on the 430, will just keep plugging away on the stumble until I figure here out. Little by little this bird keeps getting better. Can't wait to figure out this stumbling issue, along with the disk brakes and sway bars. Going to be a fun cruiser then, for sure.
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Old 01-03-2017, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OX1 View Post
Just curious what it drove like. Mine still has a mid throttle stumbling issue, which I have only tackled the fuel side of so far (seems OK after rebuild, I have a lot of years experience with the Carters/Edelbrocks).

Anyway, just curious what I am shooting for. I assume with an open diff, she should do a one wheel peel virtually forever with the advertised stock torque.

But with over 4000 lbs, a 2.4 first gear and 2.9ish diff, maybe not??
I thought YOU mentioned the rebuild first. At least that's what I read into your post.

You have a very 'tall' rear end gear, one more common to convertibles. OEM engines deliver peak torque after 4,000 rpm. Rear end gears make a dramatic difference in wheel torque. The main reason we use low gear ratios is because lower gears tend not to break. Otherwise, all we need are bigger engines that produce more torque. Not so fast...

So, the quest begins... If your tires spin, use wider tires that are more sticky. That will turn more torque into speed. Unfortunately, that makes each tooth in the ring gear, the weakest link in this drive train. If you can get the pinion gear to engage more ring gear teeth, torque will spread out over a longer surfaces (like a 3.9:1 or 4.3:1 ratio). If the rear end stays together, what about the axles? I've seen them twisted 180-degrees before breaking. The solution is, racing axles. Next, the driveshaft... and it goes on.

To answer your question directly, your rear tires may NOT easily break free from a standing start. The torque converter locks up at low rpm, tires grab too well, the ring and pinion present a 90-degree 'wall' for torque to overcome, etc. The flip side is, you may get to 150-mph if your tires are 'V' rated. - Dave
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