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  #1  
Old 11-16-2013, 08:16 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Default New motor running hot

Hey Gents, I finally fired up my new motor (1967 390). The builder said to start it and run it at 2000 RPM for 20 minutes. I got to about 10 minutes and it reached 230 degree and was very hot, so, I shut it down.
My father-in law said the fan clutch was shot and that it wasn't spinning no where near fast enough. Is that enough to make it get so hot so fast?

Also, I think understand the coolant flow in the engine, however what does the short nozzle between the intake manifold and the pump do?

One more, what is the purpose of running the engine so high for 20 minutes? I thought it was so the hydraulic lifters and rest of the engine get good oil flow. I was told once that if you don't do that you can ruin your cam.

I let it cool down for an hour, drained the water, then added a gallon of anti freeze and ran it again. This time it got up to 220 degrees in 5 minutes so I shut it down again. I wanted to get some anti freeze in the block. It's supposed to get in the low 30's tonight and I didn't want to risk a freeze.

thx, Dave J
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Old 11-16-2013, 09:21 PM
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simplyconnected simplyconnected is offline
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Was the cooling system pressurized?
Yes, a declutched fan will make it run hot BUT, the purpose of the clutch is to slow the fan down as rpms go up. High rpms should mean that the car is running down the road.

2,000 rpm should run your car about 40 mph (or more). That is not fast for an engine. At 40, there should be enough wind going through your radiator to cool it without a fan (on these cool days). Sitting stagnant and running the engine in the driveway, I would run a garden hose with light/medium flow over the rad just to pull some of the heat away. That's another reason why I like electric fans; they only run when the coolant gets hot.

BTW, what's your oil pressure at idle, and above 1,500 rpm? I hope you have a small mechanical oil pressure gauge screwed in. - Dave
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Old 11-16-2013, 10:51 PM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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Yes, the system was under pressure, as a matter of fact the overflow tank developed a small "hiss" leak when it got really hot.

I'm embarrassed to say that I don't have an oil pressure gauge hooked up. I do have a new sensor and the idiot light though. Before starting the motor I turned the oil pump counter clockwise with a drill and 1/4 inch socket through the dizzy hole. After about 5 seconds I could definitely feel it develop pressure and bog down the drill a little as it pumped oil.

I never had overheat problems with the fan (in the summer) on the old engine. However I never ran the engine at 2000 rpm just sitting still before either.
I guess I can start it in the morning when it's 35 degrees outside and just let it idle to see the temp???

Do you think it's OK to just idle it now? Do you think it had enough time and heat for the break in?

Thx Dave
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Old 11-16-2013, 11:55 PM
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Check your timing - too far retarded and its 'Chernobyll City' under the hood, trust me...
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Old 11-17-2013, 02:04 AM
davidmij davidmij is offline
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That's good to know Tom, thx!

I was told to get it running for 20 minutes and then let it idle and do the tuning, timing, etc.

Both times when it was over heating I turned it off it sputtered and popped twice out the exhaust, most likely too rich. I'm going to fire it up in the morning and set the timing. Then adjust the idle, let it warm up and do it again step by step. Hopefully it will help.

Time for bed here, (11:00pm) you should go have a pint and some lunch.

regards, Dave J
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Old 11-17-2013, 06:05 AM
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Dave, you need to know proper start-up and break-in procedures. Check out how Hastings Piston Ring company says to do it:
CLICK HERE

At Ford, we use Hastings (and have for many decades). Notice they want you to load the engine. They didn't say to run your engine fast but you do need to put a load on the engine to properly break-in rings.

They use the start-up procedure to tune the engine, so you can run the car. This is important. Start-up will tell if the engine has any immediate faults that need attention (like oil leaks, funny noises, etc.). We call this, "Hot Testing" the engine. Every single engine at Ford is loaded and tuned in the engine plant, and they all better be good before going to assembly.

At home, we don't have that luxury so you need to run the car.

After your initial break-in, simply run the car like any new car owner would. I would not let it sit running for 20 minutes. The engine needs a variety of speeds to let it settle-in.

Let me repeat, "The object is to apply a load to the engine for short periods of time and in rapid succession soon after engine warm up. This action thrusts the piston rings against the cylinder wall with increased pressure and results in accelerated ring seating."

This procedure will affect your engine for a very long time. Done right, your new overhaul should last at least ten years of hard service. - Dave
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