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  #1  
Old 04-05-2012, 06:00 AM
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Default 1960 heater valve..how many types?

Hello I would like to know how many types of heater valves there were in 1960. I have this one on my tbird with A/C:

http://www.pdani.it/public/sunnybob/IMG139.jpg


I can't find it as spare part. I saw several different types in vendors catalogues but nothing with the copper coil like mine. I'm not sure it does not work but I do have a leak (had "fog" when driving and water on passenger side). Although I think the leak is in the radiator, it appears the valve can't fully close water passage..
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Old 04-05-2012, 09:01 AM
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The valve you show is the type used originally. It is cable operated and uses the copper coil to sense the temperature in the heater core. This valve is very hard to find. The one being offered by the vendors is a vacuum operated valve with no temp sensor, and needs an additional vacuum switch to make it cable operated in addition to a vacuum source. I'm not sure if these were offered as replacements or are for another application. The same part number is used on both (in error?).
To test your unit as shown, block one of the main tubes and introduce 15 psi air pressure into the other while the unit is submerged in water The rising bubbles will pinpoint the location of your leak. If it is at the valve, there are seal kits to replace the seal (not an easy job), if it is at the point where the valve attaches to the core, then the oval rubber seal is bad and can easily be replaced. If the core itself is leaking, it can be replaced with a reproduction or repaired by a good radiator shop.
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Old 04-05-2012, 10:01 AM
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Carl, thank you so much for explanation. Just one more question, please ..what was the purpose of the copper coil? Does it open or close automatically? I make this question because mine seems stuck (never stops water passage totally)
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnybob View Post
...what was the purpose of the copper coil?..
Quote:
Originally Posted by partsetal View Post
...It is cable operated and uses the copper coil to sense the temperature in the heater core...
After sensing the core temp, it regulates water flow for a constant temp, depending on where you slide the 'TEMP' switch.
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Old 04-05-2012, 11:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by simplyconnected View Post
After sensing the core temp, it regulates water flow for a constant temp, depending on where you slide the 'TEMP' switch.

I see. Thank you very much.
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:51 PM
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You can test the operation of this coil by heating it with a hair dryer or heat gun. If it is working correctly you should see the valve move as you apply heat to the coil.
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