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Old 10-09-2015, 06:21 PM
Joe Johnston Joe Johnston is online now
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To compare what I have:

The first picture is of the 2 ROT sheets found in my 63SR (which may look different than those found in a Squarebird). The top one is for a Lincoln and the bottom is for a Thunderbird other than mine! As stated, number codes in appropriate boxes. From my limited research it is fairly common to find 2 sheets in one car and often the wrong sheet in a car as well. Perhaps done on the assembly line, or perhaps some one changed the back seat over the years. Who knows? Anything is possible over the years.

The second picture is the build sheet for my 56 (the one for my 57 looks similar). I had to purchase these, they were not in the car. Little Birds had the options and costs spelled out and is a bit similar to today's window stickers. To the best of my knowledge, this info was not available to the customer and often 55 - 57's sold for much more than the actual cost on the bottom line. This was not used like a window sticker or displayed.

IF someone does enough online research, reproductions of these forms are available. HOWEVER, there are subtle differences in the fonts of the reproductions that are obvious to someone who knows what to look for and where. To make it more interesting, the forms and the fonts used changed several times over the years. This is due to the fonts used on the teletype machines being replaced after thousands of cars built, and forms being updated or printed by different vendors.

These new sheets can be forged and printed to show whatever options you want. Going to car shows, some people are very proud of their reproductions and tell you many facts about their car that are simply amazing!!! Maybe they intentionally intend to BS a potential customer, or they truly believe what was told to them, but it certainly can be interesting at times!

Buyers must be skeptical of any documentation for high dollar cars, like supercharged 57's, or early 62 Sport Roadsters that are convertibles with the factory roadster option showing on a freshly printed ROT sheet as the authenticating documentation. If the ROT sheet doesn't show signs of wear and tear, or rust from seat cushion springs, it should be send a red flag.

The genuine ROT or build sheet is the only available documentation that I know of to guide a restorer to a concourse restoration. Hope this helps someone.





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