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-   1958 To 1960 Squarebirds - General Technical Discussion (http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=14)
-   -   Brake Shoes (http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=21980)

430bird60 09-19-2017 03:35 PM

Brake Shoes
 
I recently purchased Centric riveted brake shoes from Rock Auto. As I was installing them I noticed that the rivets on the front shoes were closer to the surface than the rivets on the back shoes. I measured the thickness on the shoes and found the front shoe to be about 5/32 and the back shoe to be about 7/32. I then measured the rivet depth from the surface of the shoes. The front shoes measured 1/32 and the back 3/32. These measurements are from a set not front axle and rear axle. I am really concerned about that 1/32 measurement and how much braking until the drums need turning. Anyone know if these shoes are defective based on my measurements or are they normal for new shoes? Thanks

Ken

jopizz 09-19-2017 04:27 PM

I wouldn't say they are defective but not all shoes are created equal. I tend to stick with Wagner or Raybestos when it comes to brake shoes or pads. I would call and tell them your concerns and see what they say. If you're not comfortable with the amount of lining then don't install them. Most of the wear is probably going to be on the back shoe so maybe that's why it's thicker. I've never had an issue with Rockauto when returning parts if you want to try another brand.

John

bird 60 09-19-2017 09:19 PM

Brake Shoes
 
Hi John, I was always under the impression that the "front'' shoes would wear out first, as they take more of the brunt.

Chris......From OZ.

jopizz 09-19-2017 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bird 60 (Post 111134)
Hi John, I was always under the impression that the "front'' shoes would wear out first, as they take more of the brunt.

Chris......From OZ.

The secondary shoe (rear) is longer and seems to take the brunt of the force in my experience. I could be wrong.

John

Deanj 09-20-2017 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jopizz (Post 111133)
I wouldn't say they are defective but not all shoes are created equal. I tend to stick with Wagner or Raybestos when it comes to brake shoes or pads.
John

I can't speak about drums and shoes, but Centric seems to sell quality parts. I like their rotors because they paint or powder coat the hat on the rotor. Their pads are positive molded.

I'd had planned on buying Centric, but I'll switch if Wagner and Raybestos has a superior brake shoe.

Dean

simplyconnected 09-20-2017 12:43 PM

This business of 'brake shoes' is tricky. I've seen many combinations over the years.

Primary and Secondary shoes are normally identified by 'PRI' or 'SEC' but not always Some are made of different materials (hardness) which are different in color. Some are longer than the other but not always.

The front shoe requires less pressure, to produce the same braking power as the rear. In other words, the drum rotation 'helps apply' pressure to the front shoe. The easiest way I can explain this is by citing hand brakes on a bicycle or motorcycle. A light pressure on the front brake does far more braking then a lot of pressure on the rear brake.

Bottom line: This is a system that brake companies engineered to balance braking power. Shoes MUST be installed correctly according to the Shop Manual and the manufacturer's instructions.

BTW, my personal preference is, bonded brakes. I've always had good luck with them but I 'stay on top' of the lining or pad wear. I also choose the softest material I can find. It wears out faster but also stops easier without chatter. - Dave

Tbird6 09-21-2017 03:53 PM

Another vote to ditch the rivets and go with bonded brake shoes.
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simplyconnected 09-21-2017 04:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tbird6 (Post 111167)
Another vote to ditch the rivets and go with bonded brake shoes...

As long as there is lining left on the shoe, I don't think it matters if you have bonded or riveted (except in the Rust Belt).

I have to confess, I know of a Dodge car in the family that sat for many months. When they fired it up, one of the rear brake linings came off the shoe from rust. It was bonded.

That lining jammed the rear wheel right in the driveway. It could have been much worse. I've never seen a riveted lining come off the shoe from rust or otherwise. Again, I stay on top to prevent problems. - Dave

partsetal 09-22-2017 08:08 AM

At a Bendix brake seminar that I attended many years ago, I remember the presenter explaining that the bonded lining, because of the high heat process and adhesives needed to bond the lining material to the steel shoe, had to be made of denser materials. The bonded lining did not have a friction coefficient as high as the material used in the riveted lining. To get the best performance from my brakes I've always chosen riveted, the same as installed in production.
Carl

Tbird6 09-22-2017 11:39 AM

That's great for 1959!
What modern car or truck use riveted shoes?
I give you a clue? NONE!

I do lots of old car work and no re-builder will warranty riveted shoes only bonded ones.
In fact the outfit I now use will install rivets in addition to bonding the linings but it's only for looks and to match original.

Rivets were ONLY used when the linings needed to be replaced in the field using basic hand tools. Those days are long gone!
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