Squarebirds, Rocketbirds, and Fifties/Sixties Ford Discussion Forum

Squarebirds, Rocketbirds, and Fifties/Sixties Ford Discussion Forum (http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/index.php)
-   1958 To 1960 Squarebirds - General Technical Discussion (http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/forumdisplay.php?f=14)
-   -   ī58 Rear suspension "issues" (http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=10678)

simplyconnected 03-07-2011 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anders (Post 53715)
...You see without the bolt and isolators the whole rear axle drops quite a bit. I guess the bolt and nut at least prevent the rear axle to drop all this...


You are showing me an axle with no shock absorbers and no springs. Of course it drops, because it should (just like a modern axle). Restricting movement and binding, should not be done between the lower arm and the axle. Your shock absorbers hold up your axle. Connect your shocks and let's see how far it drops.

I also see a rubber bumper on your upper frame member. Without springs, your axle should have freedom to reach that bumper.

Dakota Boy 03-08-2011 12:21 AM

This is really cool to see actual photos of this stuff. The '58s were certainly a rare design as far as the rear suspension is concerned.

Where your upper control "arm" or "rod" attaches to the frame... on my car there was a "torn spot" there on the right side. (I welded a stainless patch over that old injury this past winter. I have leaf springs on my '58 and dont need that mounting hole anymore.)
Based on my findings while lying on my back under the car for most every weekend this winter, I'd say that my car suffered a fender-bender on the passenger side at some point in the past.

She tells no tales of her past though, no matter how nice I speak to her....:D

Sorry to high-jack your thread with my non-contributory comments!

Astrowing 03-08-2011 10:53 AM

Do we have the dimensions of all the bushings tabulated somewhere from all these pictures? Are the upper arms and control arm pressed in?

Anders 03-08-2011 12:31 PM

The bushings in the control arms are "vulcanizied". Thatīs the most English version of the Swedish word "Vulkaniserad" I know...
The rubber is cocked on the centre metal bushing and then pressed into the control arm in a machine with a few tons of pressure. Itīs as original you can do it.
All other bushings is replaced by polyrethane bushings, that looks like "hats" and are pushed in from each side.

Astrowing 03-08-2011 04:04 PM

They are pressed just like front-end parts. Thanks. Do you have dimensions on the upper and lower arm pivot bushings? How about the control arm? Metric is fine. I can convert. :)

Anders 03-08-2011 05:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Astrowing (Post 53745)
They are pressed just like front-end parts. Thanks. Do you have dimensions on the upper and lower arm pivot bushings? How about the control arm? Metric is fine. I can convert. :)

Upper & Lower arm? The control arm is the upper arm.
I have not changed the other bushings. Only the ones in the control arm.

It is the same bushings for the forward position and the upper rear on the trailing arms. I can measure them, but not until the weekend, as I am not planning to take the parts down until I can continue with the rear part, the subject of the thread. And I have been promiced these bushings/isolators will be ready on Friday.
Can you do me a favour and mesure the sleeve until Friday? So I donīt cut mine by mistake. There should be on your car as well :) Thatīs the one I have tryed to get from Post 1.....:o

1960_430_AU 03-08-2011 08:44 PM

Hmmm after reading this whole post 3 or 4 times I thought I'd put my 2 cents worth in (I have the fire extinguisher so I'm ready to be shot down in flames :D)

From what I take from the discussion and the pics.
1 the suspension as a whole operates correctly
2 the point in question is the bolt and isolator that attaches to the lower spring saddle and the lower control arm
3 the crush length of the sleeve through the isolator

From what I can see the only real factor that this bolt/isolator controls is axle roll on acceleration like a primitive tramp rod.

If the axle is in it's normal operating position and extended to within the normal range of travel the distance between these two surface should be able to be measured and I would assume (insert ***/u/me) that the length would be a median of these measurements.
As far as I can see unless you are developing huge horsepower and drag racing I can't see a problem with running without this isolator.
When built these were supposed to be performance cars of the day were they not?

That's my bit hope i have helped or confused the issue

Richard

tbirds8 03-08-2011 08:58 PM

How long is the sleeve the bolt goes through???? Now I wana know

Anders 03-09-2011 02:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1960_430_AU (Post 53758)
If the axle is in it's normal operating position and extended to within the normal range of travel the distance between these two surface should be able to be measured and I would assume (insert ***/u/me) that the length would be a median of these measurements.

Correct, but that mean I first need to get the whole car together ( engine, tranny is not in at the moment ) and have it taken up on one of these lifts where the car stands on the tires ( as it is impossible to see and measure this having the car sits on the ground as it is way to low to get in there ), and from there bring some guys to push the rear down and up as much as possible, as the springs would be on as well...
But yes, I am alreay planning to do it when the car is finished.
I just want to be as prepared as possible before I do that.

Quote:

Originally Posted by tbirds8 (Post 53760)
How long is the sleeve the bolt goes through???? Now I wana know

It just would be such a help to know the leingth of the sleeve, as it is so much easier to play with everything at the moment, as the whole rear axle is light at the moment, and the springs is off making it very easy to check whatīs happend when the axle goes up & down.

GTE427 03-09-2011 01:18 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Anders,

Looked thru my Service Letters from that time period for information that could help you. Nothing specific to the problem you've encountered other then torque values you may not have. I've attached them for future reference as they can offer help to someone else latter on.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Any submissions to this site and any post on this site becomes property of Squarebirds.org . The webmasters reserve the right to edit and modify any submissions to this site. All material on this is site is copyrighted by the Squarebirds.org. Reproduction by any means other than for personal use is strictly prohibited. Permission to use material on this site can be obtained by contacting the webmasters. Copyright 2002-2016 by Squarebirds.org.