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Tom ~ scumdog Does Cromwell S&S!

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  • Tom ~ scumdog Does Cromwell S&S!

    "Hi Ray, Christine and I were at the annual Cromwell Car Show today, probably in excess of 800 classic cars and trucks there but here are all the Thunderbirds that we saw. We took the F100 to the show & there was at least six other Ď53 to Ď56 F100s there. More pics to follow...








    Hi Ray, Hereís more photos, first is a Mk2 Ford Zodiac, circa 1961, it however is a model that was never produced by Ford - a two door pillar less, it was created by the present owner. They only came as four-door, two door convertible, four door wagon (pretty rare) and a ute. Next two photos are of a very quick HQ Holden Monaro, circa 1973. (Aussie GM product for those who wonder where it came from). Note the complicated plumbing! The last photo is of a Mk3 Ford Zephyr, circa 1964, they originally had a 155ci. inline six cylinder motor however this one has a a Windsor V8, probably 302 stroked to 347ci (quite common here), it also has four-wheel disc brakes and auto trans. More to follow!








    OK guys, have look at this motor and see what is different about it!! At the annual Cromwell Car Show today."





    Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
    '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
    "It's Hip To Be Square"
    Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

    Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

  • #2
    Can't see the cylinder heads clearly enough, but, I would say a big block Chevrolet with Ford Cleveland type valve covers grafted on.

    Do I win the free prize? DO I, Do I, DO I????

    To bad the owner would appear to be embarrassed by the engine choice for his ride.

    Scott.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by pbf777 View Post
      Can't see the cylinder heads clearly enough, but, I would say a big block Chevrolet with Ford Cleveland type valve covers grafted on.

      Do I win the free prize? DO I, Do I, DO I????

      To bad the owner would appear to be embarrassed by the engine choice for his ride.

      Scott.
      Close but no coconut!
      Its actually a small- block Chevrolet.

      And if you look closely it’s been fitted with a set of Cleveland heads as well as the valve covers you mentioned!

      And now you’ve seen such a beast actually exists!!!
      A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

      Comment


      • #4
        Tom ~ scumdog Does Cromwell S&S!

        "Hi Ray, Some more photos from Cromwell.
        The gold XM Falcon is Aussie assembled - hence the steering on the right.

        The grey utility is a EH Holden from 1964.

        The car with the Chrysler hemi in it is not a Dodge Dart despite its appearance- itís a Chrysler Valiant coupe, Aussie assembled. (Note which side the steering wheel is on)

        The Ď61 Fairlane was sold new in NZ (steering on right and four doors are a big giveaway) and has a very grunty 460 Ford motor.

        The last car is a HK (I think!) Holden Kingswood circa 1969. They originally generally came with a 186ci six cylinder and three speed column shift.

        Well, thatís it from me today, Tom"

        Here are those pix.
        Attached Files

        Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
        '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
        "It's Hip To Be Square"
        Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

        Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          The Ď61 Fairlane was sold new in NZ (steering on right and four doors are a big giveaway) and has a very grunty 460 Ford motor.


          Tom love the front end on the 61 Fairlane especially the chrome
          Dano Calgary,Alberta Canada
          Thunderbird Registry
          58HT #33317
          60 HT (Sold )

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Tom, I think that Holden sedan is a HG as the HK had a metal grille, and that one is plastic (I think). Looked to be a great day though! Was that a small photo bomb in the same shot by a 250 Cortina by chance? Those things had major mumbo.
            sigpicBill
            Thunderbird Registry 21903 & 33405

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Penelope View Post
              Hi Tom, I think that Holden sedan is a HG as the HK had a metal grille, and that one is plastic (I think). Looked to be a great day though! Was that a small photo bomb in the same shot by a 250 Cortina by chance? Those things had major mumbo.

              Yep Bill, you are probably right! My knowledge of HK HT HG is not that great - but I love the Monaros of the generation.
              And on second thoughts the ute is a EJ not a EH.
              The Cortina was a 1600 from memory, I do know of the 250. (I had the Vauxhall equivalent, a 3.3 Victor)
              By the way, how do you think they fitted those Clevo heads to the Chev motor as per the pictures I sent in?
              A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by scumdog View Post
                Yep Bill, you are probably right! My knowledge of HK HT HG is not that great - but I love the Monaros of the generation.
                And on second thoughts the ute is a EJ not a EH.
                The Cortina was a 1600 from memory, I do know of the 250. (I had the Vauxhall equivalent, a 3.3 Victor)
                By the way, how do you think they fitted those Clevo heads to the Chev motor as per the pictures I sent in?
                I'm not much of an engineer but my guess would be a whole lot of metal fab, including filling up holes in the block and drilling / tapping new ones OR in the heads maybe, and if thats the way they did, hats off to them with galleries and ports involved etc. Maybe a slim adapter plate instead?

                Wouldn't it have been easier to put a real Ford engine in it?

                Good call on the EJ / EH ute but consider they both had the same tail lights (the EJ ones).
                sigpicBill
                Thunderbird Registry 21903 & 33405

                Comment


                • #9
                  [QUOTE=Penelope;113252]Wouldn't it have been easier to put a real Ford engine in it?

                  No doubt, but as you said, "hats off to them" for their effort.

                  This conversion could be accomplished a number of ways, but in the end, would any truly be of sound engineering, and withstand the trials of extensive operation? For example, just drilling and tapping holes in the deck of the block for the Ford head bolt pattern, where are the reinforcement bosses for adequate thread engagement and support?

                  If it were I, the spacer plate would seem to be of a more durable means of execution. Consisting of a minimum thickness permitting the Chevrolet head bolt pattern (counter-sunk) for retention to the block, and providing the threaded bolt pattern for the retention of the Ford cylinder head. Coolant pathway alignment/adaption would also be accomplished within this distance as perhaps the oil drain-backs. One would just accept the cylinder bore centers misalignment as it isn't so great (GM: 4.400" vs. Ford 4.380") staggering the offset from center (something practiced even by original manufactures e.g. Jaguar as the "XK" engine grew from 3.4L/3.8L then to 4.2L).

                  This "adapter plate", ideally of cast iron, is bolted permanently to the block with a thin (.010"- .015") shim steel or copper gasket; then the block/plate assemblies' cylinders are bored & honed to size (this process has previously been practiced in racing applications to provide "high-deck" block configurations).

                  A longer than the standard connecting rod, and perhaps taking advantage of the increased deck height, coupled to a "stroker" crank, will be required in order to realize a reasonable piston compression height.

                  Obviously, an intake manifold will need to be modified/fabricated; one which provides the induction port arrangement of the, in this case Cleveland, but of the dimensional fitment for the non standard deck-height (GM SBC: 9.00" vs. Ford 351C: 9.200" or Ford 400C: 10.300" all +/-, but now including the "spacer"); and also with provisions for the GM distributor mounting.

                  Etc, etc, etc.

                  It sure would be easier, to just bolt in the manufacture of choice vs. the hybred created; but it certainly is unique, and if your having fun doing it, more-power-to-ya!

                  Scott
                  Last edited by pbf777; January 23rd, 2018, 05:59 PM.

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