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  • #16
    You can see in the picture the tapered flange that contacts the face of the block. As I mentioned before if you can't put a feeler gauge between the flange and the block you are ok. If you don't have a feeler gauge use a credit card.

    John


    camshaft.jpg
    John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

    Thunderbird Registry #36223
    jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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    • #17
      Thanks John: I think the cam is where is where it should be. Looking down the distributor hole the cam gears to drive the distributor appear centered on the oil pump shaft. I would think that would off centered if the cam was not in the correct postion. any other suggestions on timing before i bolt thisbck together oh i need o found a spring retainer.

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      • #18
        I would set the timing per the spec. 6 degrees BTDC with the vacuum hose to the distributor off and plugged and the idle speed as low as possible (preferably 600 rpm or lower).

        John
        John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

        Thunderbird Registry #36223
        jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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        • #19
          Thanks Everyone. I will check in later to let you know the outcome. I really appreciate everyone's help. Guess I know what I am doing this afternoon.

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          • #20
            Just a few words of caution...
            This is a new FE rebuild. I don't need to say that it needs to be done right. The lifters need to be centered on the cam lobes. 1/8" (.125") 'out of square' is way out of tolerance. If this cam used a thrust plate, the Ford recommended end play is 012". BTW, the thrust plate always keeps the cam BEHIND the face of the block.

            The bottom timing sprocket floats on the crankshaft so that it always centers the chain with the cam sprocket. That means, regardless of your straightedge the bottom sprocket will always align.

            I would not attempt to run any engine with the cam sticking out. Find the cause and fix it. FE engines are tricky to build and they are different from GM engines. Many will tell you to find an EXPERIENCED FE builder. I agree. Do whatever it takes to get it right before damage happens. If the flex plate needs to be removed, do it, and follow the Shop Manual when you assemble everything. That book will save you time, money and a lot of work. Good luck. - Dave
            My latest project:
            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
            --Lee Iacocca

            From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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            • #21
              FE cams pre 1963 used this early built in flange style camshaft. (like John’s pic). These cams were thrusted against the block face with the spring & button. With the early flange type cams you need the early narrow hub cam sprocket.
              Looks like your early cam is installed correct with flange thrusting against the block.

              The rear cam plug has to be installed correctly per Dave’s pic.

              1963 & later Ford went with the cam and thrust plate design which controls cam walk. Much better design. The later style cam sprocket has a thicker hub to match cam and thrust plate style.

              Front cam bearing should be below block face about .005” for cam thrust oiling in early or late cam thrust designs.

              With timing set installed you chain should be parallel with block face. This will confirm you have correct early cam timing gear. Which will put your fuel pump eccentric in correct plain.

              Note : timing gear & chain install on crankshaft , than oil slinger , than timing cover (with spring & button) , than crankshaft spacer & damper torqued.
              When doing a cover replacement with oil pan already on. Alignment with keeping crankshaft seal centered is important.

              Good luck.



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              • #22
                Well its back together, runs and not leaking. Since nothing was changed, nothing changed and this 352 is still making a loud noise that I doubt was acceptable back in the day. I can't tell exactly where the noise is coming from, front end/cam, valves, or manifold leak. Not sure where to go at this point.

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                • #23
                  Engine noises can be tricky to find. They can sound like they're coming from one area and they can come from a completely different area. Use a piece of heater hose, put it up to your ear and place it on different parts of the engine. This should narrow down where the noise is coming from. I agree with 9310alloy that the cam flange was correctly positioned against the block so I don't think that is your problem. Exhaust leaks can also sound like engine noises so I wouldn't rule that out. You can also try turning the motor by hand using a breaker bar and socket on the crank bolt to see if you hear any odd noises. It's easier if you take the spark plugs out.

                  John
                  John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                  Thunderbird Registry #36223
                  jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                  http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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                  • #24
                    Check your oil. If you see early discoloration or metal, you have a serious problem that needs to be fixed. A new build should sound just like a new engine (because it is). Everything should run smooth and strong right from the start. - Dave
                    My latest project:
                    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                    --Lee Iacocca

                    From: Royal Oak, Michigan

                    Comment

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