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  • carburetor choice

    OK, my next question for you gents is this. What carb is a good size/model, etc for my setup? I want good throttle response and power without going over kill.

    My 1959 T-bird set up is a 390 with C4AE-6090g heads (Valves 2.02, 1.55 inch - port size 2.34X1.34 Ex port size 1.84X1.28, FPA headers with dual 2.5 inch exhaust. My trans is a close ratio 4 speed toploader. Rear end will be somewhere between a 3.55ish to a 3.9ish.

    I currently have the stock autolite 4100 series 600cfm? I hear that is a good carb, but will it provide enough flow for my slightly more than stock setup? I will eventually go to a Edelbrock performance RPM manifold.

    If I stay with this carb I have a good local mechanic that will rebuild it for $225, is that reasonable?

    thx in advance, Dave J

  • #2
    Originally posted by davidmij View Post

    I currently have the stock autolite 4100 series 600cfm? I hear that is a good carb, but will it provide enough flow for my slightly more than stock setup? I will eventually go to a Edelbrock performance RPM manifold.

    If I stay with this carb I have a good local mechanic that will rebuild it for $225, is that reasonable?
    TWO HUNDRED AND HOW MANY DUCKETS?!?

    ...gawd...

    IMO, the 1.12 carb you have now will more than suffice for a street engine. You will most likely have to fatten it for the headers.

    This carb is easy to rebuild yourself.

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    • #3
      It costs about $17.00 for the rebuild kit and takes maybe a couple hours to disassemble, clean and reassemble. That's highway robbery.

      John
      John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

      Thunderbird Registry #36223
      jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

      http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Thx guys, I thought it seemed a little high. I'm guessing mechanics charge about $90 and hour. 2 hours max labor and $17 for the kit.
        I could buy the kit, but I know next to nothing about carbs, and at our altitude of 7000 feet it probably would need some tweaking from any (standard) online instructions (or my shop manual) which I believe had the same basic carb for the 352 the car came with.

        There's a guy on craigslist in Albuquerque that sells refurbished carbs. Albuquerque is a mile high, (just like Denver). I think I'll see what he can do price wise? He has a 90 day warranty.

        Dave

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        • #5
          If unable to rebuild yourself, I would consider PONY CARBS.

          Make sure you inform them of the engine upgrades.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Gary, sadly Pony Carbs is out of business. I went to their home page and tried calling them but the numbers didn't work. I was reading this link and at the bottom is the bad news. It's from 2009 - strange that their web page is still up.
            http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/86...rburetors.html

            Sounds like the Autolite 4100 carb itself is a good one to keep. I have no idea what they are talking about with the "spread bore" verses "square bore". Hopefully I can find someone good to get mine rebuilt.

            Dave J

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            • #7
              Originally posted by davidmij View Post

              Thanks Gary, sadly Pony Carbs is out of business. I went to their home page and tried calling them but the numbers didn't work. I was reading this link and at the bottom is the bad news. It's from 2009 - strange that their web page is still up.


              Pony Carburetors went out of business late last year when the owner passed away. Even though their website is still up, they will not return any phone calls, answer emails, and their Ebay store is gone. There are other carburetor shops out there that restores Autolite carburetors, but the "Spreadbore" was something only Pony Carburetors did.
              ... sheesh ...

              Originally posted by davidmij continues

              Sounds like the Autolite 4100 carb itself is a good one to keep. I have no idea what they are talking about with the "spread bore" verses "square bore". Hopefully I can find someone good to get mine rebuilt.

              Dave J
              The AUTOLITE was one of the best and was designed by HOLLEY for FOMOCO, first year 1957. It was only dropped when FORD had to comply with more strict emission regulations.

              PONY CARBS "SPREADBORE" was a specially modified 4100 that was meant for street use as 4100 cores are drying up.

              It is a keeper, even if you don't use it.

              Also, GOOGLE HOLLEY 4010 carburetor. This is an advanced design.

              Comment


              • #8
                I think I found a really good company to help me do my carburetor, Mikes Carburetor Parts. http://www.carburetor-parts.com/
                Here's a link for several videos on youtube that they post to help you do just about any job.; http://www.youtube.com/user/MikesCar.../videos?view=0

                Now I have a question. My car starts beautifully every time. However, after I drive it for about 10 minutes the idle goes up and it won't kick down. It's like the choke is working backwards. I have the heat riser hooked up to the choke from the exhaust manifold. Also, when I get the headers what do I do with the choke heat riser inlet?

                thx in advance, Dave J

                Comment


                • #9
                  Have you looked to see if your choke is wide open after it gets hot. The 4100 has two idle adjustments. A fast idle screw on the passenger side of the carb that hits the choke cam and a slow idle screw on the driver side. If your choke is wide open the fast idle adjustment should be off and it should only use the slow idle screw. You may have to back that screw off to slow the idle. It's also possible that your anti-stall dashpot is set too high.

                  John
                  John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                  Thunderbird Registry #36223
                  jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                  http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Also get a can of aerosol choke cleaner and clean all of the linkages and make sure it operates freely.

                    If you go to tubular headers, most convert to a fully electric choke. If this proves not satisfactory (electric chokes usually are quick to open fully), you can add a fabricated choke stove to one of the header tubes. I will show you how when the time comes.

                    Do you have a Shop Manual (FORD)? It will describe choke operation and adjustments.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thx gents, I forgot about the screw on the fast idle side. When I had the motor out I noticed that screw was stripped so I replaced it and forgot to adjust it any. I don't know carbs so I'll try my manual. Trouble is, my manual is for a 59 T-bird, the motor and carb are out of a 67 LTD. It might just be the same though - I'll check.

                      Just talked to Stan at FPA and he's shipping my headers today. I need to find a good source for exhaust pipes etc. I'd like to have an "H" or "X" pipe and then have the pipes turn out in front of the rear tires with a cap before the short, glasspak mufflers.

                      I'll definitely let you know Gary after I get the headers on so you can tell me about the choke stove.

                      thx, Dave J

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Does it get that COLD in NM to warrant a header choke stove?

                        Maybe your in Northern NM??
                        sigpic
                        The 1960 Ford Thunderbird. The WORLD'S most wanted car....

                        VTCI Member#6287.

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                        • #13
                          You guessed it Jon, I'm in Northern NM - in Los Alamos. It doesn't get super cold, but because we're at 7000 feet it's more like Denver. Santa Fe is at 6000 and Albuquerque is even at 5200. We get up to 95 for an extreme high and extreme lows are in the single digits. If I ever drive the car in the winter it'll be during a warm trend.
                          I have a friend who just started dental school in N. Texas in Amarillo, she's decided to be a dental hygienes. Her husband is doing a frame off restoration of a 54 ford truck. That's kind of what got me interested in my Ratrod project.

                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            For your info Ford has different carburetor jets listed for 5000-10000 ft. I'm not sure whether they are installed at the factory or by the dealers.

                            John
                            John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                            Thunderbird Registry #36223
                            jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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                            • #15
                              Thx John, one of the guys at a carb site online told me the same thing about the jets. The car was an Albuquerque car so I'm pretty sure they are the correct jets. When I rebuild I'll make sure I get the correct ones. He also told me that the thinner air means less oxygen, which means I need to set the choke leaner to get more air (oxygen).

                              So anyway, you were spot on John. I took it for a run and whenever I floor it and open the secondary's the idle goes up and doesn't kick down. I got out and started to adjust the fast idle screw. When I pushed the screw driver into the screw slot it was enough pressure to push the throttle plate back down just a little and the idle dropped to where it should be. So, it seems that the secondary throttle closing lever isn't seating quite to the little all-thread stop screw - unless I get out and push it back down the last 1/16 of an inch. It seats fine until I floor it and open the secondards, then when it closes it just doesn't quite close that last 1/16 of an inch - it gets stuck.

                              I think I need to read more of the manual and see how the primary and secondary linkage ties together and try to see what is holding that tiny little bit open. I cleaned it pretty well when I had the carb off, and I didn't take the throttle plates out, but it still can't hurt to give it a good shot of carb cleaner on the throttle shaft.

                              Kind of strange that when the engine is off and I floor it to see how it works, the secondary throttle closing lever does go all the way back and sits on the stop screw like it should.

                              I hope what I wrote makes sense. I was having to look up the names of the pieces in my manual as I wrote. ;0)

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