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390 heads and intake question

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  • #16
    Valley tray ...

    It must have been left out by whoever was in there last. Having the tray in place will help control oil mist in the valley and prevent expulsion through your breather or pvc system if your using one, (there is no up side to running a road draft tube) which is a good idea even if not originally equipped that way. Mike

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    • #17
      Thx Mike,
      The motor is actually out of a 1967 LTD and doesn't have the draft tube. It has a PVC in the valve cover. I'll have to find a valley tray on E-bay I guess. They sure are pricey for a piece of sheet metal.
      regards, Dave

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      • #18
        Hey guys, for the sheet metal stock to block the cross overs; would something like the thickness of Pro panel roofing be about right? How does it hold in place? Can I just hold it there with some gasket sealer and then assemble the rest?
        Also, would it be OK to just put epoxy in the head portion of the cross over instead? Being that the heads are new and clean I thought that might be easier.
        thx, Dave J
        I ordered a valley pan on E-bay $80 with shipping! Dang, that's pricey.

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        • #19
          Use some steel shim stock with your gasket. Epoxy breaks down under heat, so don't use that on any hot engine parts. I don't know about using roofing metal, but stay away from aluminum. - Dave
          My latest project:
          CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

          "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
          --Lee Iacocca

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          • #20
            Thanks Dave, will do.
            Just trying to make some building notes so that when I get the block back and I start building I can refer to my notes and get going.
            appreciate all your help!

            Dave J

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            • #21
              I'm at a similar point. I suppose I can replace the screws with small bolts and lock washers. Whats that steel wool stuff in there?

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              • #22
                I re-read the last few posts on this string and don't quite follow your question Yadkin?

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                • #23
                  I'm talking about the sheet metal baffle under the intake manifold. After I remove the screws I assume that I can replace them with small bolts and lock washers?

                  Also, there is a steel mesh fabric in the rear section of the baffle, apparently to reduce oil flow to the down draft (or pcv) system. I'll try and soak this in solvent to clean it but if I can't get it clean I'll have to replace it. I'm not sure what type of material would be appropriate to use as a replacement.

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                  • #24
                    I sued stainless steel scrubbing pads (withouth soap) from the grocery store in the valley pan space on my Y-Block. SS screen (hardware cloth) may work also.

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                    • #25
                      Two thoughts came to mind when you said, Y-block. I don't mean to get sidetracked but the Y has a separate 'valley pan' as I call it.

                      I had all my sheet metal chromed and assembled with stainless.


                      While the engine was still on the stand, I noticed the cam got REAL HARD to turn. I scratched my head for ten minutes over that one. Turns out, if the valley pan screws are too long, they squeeze the cam bearings underneath. Thank God nothing was harmed but I learned a lot about the engine and the dangers of using long bolts that day. Sometimes studs and nuts work better.

                      The second thought regarding the draft mesh makes my skin crawl. Shedding pieces of spun steel can get into your oil pump and really screw it up. I don't know if ScotchBrite material is heat resistant enough but it might be suitable to use. Stainless mesh isn't necessary but it is still good as long as it holds together. - Dave
                      My latest project:
                      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                      --Lee Iacocca

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                      • #26
                        The shop building my engine claimed they always used the stainless steel material when needed. Mine was missing from the "box" on the pan's underside. Scotchbrite won't stand the heat, the copper scrubbing material could corrode and crumble in time. They have also used ss window screen wadded up to condense the fumes, but you have to buy a large amount and the scrub pads are in a useable size/shape ready to use.

                        (Hope you also checked the oil passages to make sure the hole in the cam bearing was fully open.)

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                        • #27
                          I love the idea of using copper window screen. I suppose aluminum would work as well.

                          Re: Y-block... read the second paragraph CLICK HERE

                          I have found some Y-blocks offer less resistance when I blow down that center cam bearing hole. I have also sent a loooong 1/4" drill bit down to open the cam bearing hole just a little more.

                          My rocker arms have great oil flow at every valve stem. I also plugged the drain so the shaft is pressurized. That raised my idle oil pressure to 40-psi. My Y's run at about 55-psi. - Dave
                          My latest project:
                          CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                          "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                          --Lee Iacocca

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                          • #28
                            I wouldn't use copper or aluminum because of dissimilar metals and galvanic corrosion. I ll ask my machinist what he uses.

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