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Pertronix Distributor

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  • #31
    I use KopperKote (sp?) on everything I don't want siezed, it works a treat.
    A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by scumdog View Post
      I use KopperKote (sp?) on everything I don't want siezed, it works a treat.
      Tom, be extremely careful using Kopr-Kote, and NOT on zinc plated bolts (which most of mine are). Read their site:
      http://www.jetlube.com/pages/kopr-koteIND.html
      My latest project:
      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
      --Lee Iacocca

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      • #33
        Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
        Tom, be extremely careful using Kopr-Kote, and NOT on zinc plated bolts (which most of mine are). Read their site:
        http://www.jetlube.com/pages/kopr-koteIND.html
        No worries Dave, I'm not rich enough to afford zinc plated nuts & bolts!
        My main use of it is on anything that is part of an exhaust system.
        A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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        • #34
          Last night I went through the Pertronix electrical tests, found and repaired two problems.

          The resistance between the distributor base plate and battery ground was about 3 Ohms, and they recommend a maximum of 0.2. I traced it to the battery cable. It wasn't the connectors but the actual cable itself. So I purchased a new $8 cable.

          The voltage at the coil under load was just over 8 volts, and Pertronix likes at least 10. As you know, there are two wires from the ignition switch to the engine bay. One powers the coil through a resistor wire to maintain about 6 volts. The other goes to the starter solenoid and gives the coil full battery voltage while cranking. I had simply used the second wire to power the coil. It turns out that it is a smaller gauge, I had to add on some length, and it had a good amount of resistance itself. So I ran a new 12 gauge wire from the switch directly to the coil, and now I get 10.4 volts.

          The engine ran better but still not perfect. I tried using a second strike setting on the pertronix box but that made it worse.

          One problem that has started to develop, so must be related, is that the car bogs down once or twice after about the first mile or so. It just loses spark for a split second.

          I'm thinking that the problem may be because I don't have full 12 volts at the coil. The resistance is probably in the key switch. I'm thinking that the easiest way to get 12 volts is to use a relay, but I don't like the idea of having a fuse or relay in that circuit. If I have time tomorrow I'll power the coil from the battery and take a test drive.

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          • #35
            I went the relay way.
            And used the original coil wire to activate the relay - it's not voltage dependent.
            A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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            • #36
              I powered the coil directly off the battery and no improvement. Powered from the ignition switch with the engine running I get 13.5 volts at the coil vs. 13.9 volts at the battery itself.

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              • #37
                I get about 1.0 Ohm resistance between the battery negative and the distributor case. This is lower than the 3.0 with the old cable but not as good as the 0.1 that I got after I put the new cable in two days ago. It would be easy for me to run a #12 wire ground from the distributor body to the battery but I think I'm chasing a ghost here.

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                • #38
                  EMI may be the culprit here. I am running MSD Street Fire wires and when I tried a set of OEM style Motorcraft wires, performance was a lot worse. I'm going to try a set of MSD superconductor wires, that claim to have very good EMI suppression.

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                  • #39
                    BINGO. The MSD superconductor wires did the trick. I can actually use my Second Strike unit now too.

                    The other thing I did that probably had an impact was to shield the distributor trigger wires and the ignition box input wires by twisting the pairs, then covering with tinned copper weave jackets. The jackets are grounded at one end only, together to the chassis.

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