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  • #16
    Update

    OK, now the days are longer at at times warmer I've got back into this project.

    I like things to not look they've been messed around with in the engine bay so I mounted the relay behind the windscreen-washer bag out of sight.

    I used a thin section of aluminium to mount the relay, the plate is held in place by the same screws that are holding the washer-bag beacket.

    Now another questions for you brain-boxes out there:

    I have a wire of reasonable diameter that runs from the side of the starter relay across to the drivers side under the top radiator support/cowl.

    It supplies power to the relays that give 12V to the coil and horn.

    Is it a Good Idea to tap into this wire for power to my headlight relay?

    Because:
    (a) It's handy, only 6" from relay.
    (b) It means if they ignition key is turned to 'off' the headlights are too - can't walk off and leave the lights on by mistake!

    Thoughts?
    Reasons maybe NOT to do this?
    A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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    • #17
      Are you talking about the green/red wire going to the voltage regulator? If so, you're defeating your purpose IMO. Why not run a new FUSED black wire from the start relay hot lug to power the new relay(s). It won't look too out of place. Good luck, Bob C

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      • #18
        Originally posted by redstangbob View Post
        Are you talking about the green/red wire going to the voltage regulator? If so, you're defeating your purpose IMO. Why not run a new FUSED black wire from the start relay hot lug to power the new relay(s). It won't look too out of place. Good luck, Bob C
        Thanks redstangob, however the wire I thought of using is the one I already have that comes from the 'hot lug' you mentioned.
        And the relay which is kinda like a two-in-one relay for high & low beam has a fuse for each circuit built-in.
        A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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        • #19
          OKAY!
          Done and dusted - fitted the relay, did all the wiring and made on loom and at all works! woo-hoo!
          AND you can't tell it's all there unless you look carefully.

          Took heaps of pics and will post them as soon as the lovely Mrs Scumdogg shows me how - I'll also post details in case anybody else wants to do the same.

          NOW to get the CVT out and replace it - I need 'Instructions for Dummies" type info on how to get the CVT out - I can see the sucker, get my hand on it but not able to detach it.

          I have taken off the 'wood'-grain panel that runs from the steering column to the console and I have taken out the panel that mounts the clock/wiper switch etc.

          But it looks like I might have to take out the speedometer housing - how do I do THAT???
          A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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          • #20
            Well!
            THAT was a waste of time - all that torture and my guages STILL read wrong - in fact it looks like they peg-out even quicker than before!

            Except the fuel guage which still seems to be asleep for the first 10 miles or so...

            Any ideas why they behave this way?

            A faulty brand-new CVT?

            OR?
            A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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            • #21
              I'm sure you used your volt meter to measure the regulator's output before you started... What voltage did you read?
              My latest project:
              CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

              "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
              --Lee Iacocca

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              • #22
                Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                I'm sure you used your volt meter to measure the regulator's output before you started... What voltage did you read?
                Uh-oh Dave, I goofed and never even thought about the multimeter - I did that bad thing and 'assumed' th eold CVT was bad...dang!

                (looks like there's going to be some unscrewing of self-tappers again..)
                A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

                Comment


                • #23
                  That Multimeter can save you lots of unnecessary pain and time.

                  Use the DC scale for measuring voltage on live wires.
                  Use the OHM scale to measure resistance on dead wires or car body. <--This will indicate if your grounds are good (like on your fuel tank). Lower numbers (resistance) mean a better ground.
                  My latest project:
                  CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                  "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                  --Lee Iacocca

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                    That Multimeter can save you lots of unnecessary pain and time.

                    Use the DC scale for measuring voltage on live wires.
                    Use the OHM scale to measure resistance on dead wires or car body. <--This will indicate if your grounds are good (like on your fuel tank). Lower numbers (resistance) mean a better ground.
                    So...one wire going into CVT would be 12V and the other SHOULD be???
                    A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      The old regulators used contacts that opened and closed, giving an AVERAGE of six volts. Your meter will see it as 12-volts, then zero, then 12-volts, etc.

                      The newer solid state regulators output a real six volts DC.

                      The regulator's case needs a good electrical connection to the body.
                      My latest project:
                      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                      --Lee Iacocca

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Is this a replacement CVR? Is it an original type or a solid state type? The original types sold by the vendors are Chinese JUNK! I say that after much experience. There's a few ways to go solid state, and that's the only way to go. Google it, you'll find the answer. Good luck, Bob C

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