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Bearing size for 61 tbird rear axle

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  • Bearing size for 61 tbird rear axle

    I would,like to put rear disk brakes on my 61 t bird but i don't know if I have small bearing or large bearings? Sellers on Ebay sells kits and I want to make sure I dont want to spend my money on a produduct that wont fit. Any insight will help. Thanks

  • #2
    The bearing number is written on the side of your bearing. You may also measure it or bring an axle to your local auto parts store. - Dave
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

    Comment


    • #3
      I believe your T-Bird would have the "small-bearing" size, and perhaps a double check vs. disassembly and measuring (best) is to establish that your unit has 3/8" dia. "T-bolts" w/ 9/16" hex wrenching size nuts vs. something else, utilized for retention of the axle & backing plate to housing. These are visible externally, passing tru the axle retaining plate (not visible without disassembly), backing plate & axle housing flange terminating w/ the retaining nut.

      Note that beyond bearing sizes there are also several different bolt patterns for the Ford 9 inch axle housing flanges (important!).

      Best to disassemble, for a proper inspection, and leave no doubt, of what you have (perhaps this unit is not original to the car?), and communicate with the supplier as to what you have and receive assurance that their product is correct as far as fitment.

      If no verbal communication is possible (aka. ebay only web site) for such conclusion, or you receive to your inquiries "I-dunt-know"...........pass on the deal, as it will prove to be trouble.

      Scott.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Papa Gary View Post
        I would,like to put rear disk brakes on my 61 t bird ...
        I agree that front shoes are grossly sub-standard for stopping a T-bird. Rear drum brakes are quite a different story.

        Rear drums are standard on my wife's 2010 Escape so they are still widely used because they work well. Since rear brakes only help with ~25% of braking and they have no problem locking the wheels, why change to rear disks?

        Don't get me wrong, it's your money and your car to do with what you want but I cannot realize the advantage in rear disks. When we retrofit from drums to disks in the front, one of the challenges is to tame down the rear drum brakes because they require far less hydraulic pressure than the disks to lock-up the wheels.

        Then, there is the issue of how to deal with the emergency brake. Keeping it stock satisfies that as well because the stock system works very well. Just say'n.

        BTW, all bearings and seal sizes are metric and always have been. I hope this helps. - Dave
        My latest project:
        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
        --Lee Iacocca

        Comment


        • #5
          I agree regarding the rear drums, but my desire to eventually go disc in the rear is the benefit of being able to pull the wheels of the car in a simpler fashion. Those drums are what I hang up on when I try to remove my wheels. IE, there is no pulling a wheel off my car unless you are in a shop somewhere..

          Of course me having a 58, with the original rear end means all my rear end issues are different than the norm...

          The fact that the discs do look better would be an added benefit.

          But like you are saying the drums get the job done very well, so the swap to disc is way down my list of items that are important

          Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
          I agree that front shoes are grossly sub-standard for stopping a T-bird. Rear drum brakes are quite a different story.

          Rear drums are standard on my wife's 2010 Escape so they are still widely used because they work well. Since rear brakes only help with ~25% of braking and they have no problem locking the wheels, why change to rear disks?

          Don't get me wrong, it's your money and your car to do with what you want but I cannot realize the advantage in rear disks. When we retrofit from drums to disks in the front, one of the challenges is to tame down the rear drum brakes because they require far less hydraulic pressure than the disks to lock-up the wheels.

          Then, there is the issue of how to deal with the emergency brake. Keeping it stock satisfies that as well because the stock system works very well. Just say'n.

          BTW, all bearings and seal sizes are metric and always have been. I hope this helps. - Dave

          Comment


          • #6
            Good point about mounting custom (deep) wheels. Disks are set at least a couple inches farther back than drums.

            Can you see the disks? Many of our members still cover their custom wheels with stock (full) hubcaps that hide everything behind the wheel. - Dave
            My latest project:
            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
            --Lee Iacocca

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
              Good point about mounting custom (deep) wheels. Disks are set at least a couple inches farther back than drums.

              Can you see the disks? Many of our members still cover their custom wheels with stock (full) hubcaps that hide everything behind the wheel. - Dave
              If I ever get the far, the answer is yes, you will see them on my bird...

              I just need to match the fronts I have.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                Good point about mounting custom (deep) wheels. Disks are set at least a couple inches farther back than drums.

                Can you see the disks? Many of our members still cover their custom wheels with stock (full) hubcaps that hide everything behind the wheel. - Dave
                So I can assume that disks does provide an advantage when considering offset distancing from say fender to tire, especially when using wheel and tire packages that are larger than factory specs?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Papa Gary View Post
                  So I can assume that disks does provide an advantage when considering offset distancing from say fender to tire, especially when using wheel and tire packages that are larger than factory specs?
                  Absolutely! Wheels must clear the outer edge of drums which are flush with the axle face. Disks are set back at least a couple inches and their calipers are normally offset from the top.

                  Some wheel back spacing is so deep both shocks (on coil spring suspensions) must be disconnected so the axle can hang down for wheel mounting. That's why those wheels must be removed in a shop.
                  My latest project:
                  CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                  "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                  --Lee Iacocca

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                    Absolutely! Wheels must clear the outer edge of drums which are flush with the axle face. Disks are set back at least a couple inches and their calipers are normally offset from the top.

                    Some wheel back spacing is so deep both shocks (on coil spring suspensions) must be disconnected so the axle can hang down for wheel mounting. That's why those wheels must be removed in a shop.
                    I don't know if my pics came out, but here is a my American racing novas test mounted on my 61 with the skirts on. They are 17x7 with 0 offsets. As you can see, I'm pushing it with the distance between the front of the tire to the fender well. I bounce the car several times to ensure I won't be scraping anything. Let me know if my pics came out right. Disks might help here

                    /Users/garyyeargans/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary/Thumbnails/2016/12/24/20161224-230449/GB4cAEi+SgCh6MfhaANxhw/thumb_IMG_0997_1024.jpg/Users/garyyeargans/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary/Thumbnails/2016/12/24/20161224-230449/MSj3KDU2SQSd+zGglXVjMg/thumb_IMG_1001_1024.jpg
                    /Users/garyyeargans/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary/Thumbnails/2016/12/24/20161224-230449/PihU2mWDT06IDSsSpQZoHQ/thumb_IMG_0993_1024.jpg
                    Last edited by Papa Gary; December 24th, 2017, 12:00 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Papa Gary View Post
                      I don't know if my pics came out, but here is a my American racing novas test mounted on my 61 with the skirts on. They are 17x7 with 0 offsets. As you can see, I'm pushing it with the distance between the front of the tire to the fender well. I bounce the car several times to ensure I won't be scraping anything. Let me know if my pics came out right. Disks might help here

                      /
                      Gary,

                      You can only post pictures directly from your pc if you are a paid member. Otherwise you will have to use an external photo hosting service. If you want you can email them to me and I will post them for you.

                      John
                      John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                      Thunderbird Registry #36223
                      jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                      http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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