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Lowering The Rocket

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  • Lowering The Rocket

    Hi, I want to lower the front end of my '62 is it feasible to cut one coil off the front springs to do so as it is on GM cars. If anyone has done this it would be great to hear from you.
    Thanks
    Gas

  • #2
    I've been wanting to do the same to my '63. I haven't gotten around to it yet, but here's the info I'll rely on when I do.

    https://www.eatondetroitspring.com/c...-coil-springs/

    The only coil springs that can be safely cut are coil springs with tangential ends.
    The problem is, with the springs still in the car I can't tell for sure which type of ends they have, and I can't tell from the pics in the manual. I'm sure John or Dave will be along soon to let us know.

    Be sure to take some measurements and before and after pics if/when you do it. Good luck!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gas62tbird View Post
      Hi, I want to lower the front end of my '62 is it feasible to cut one coil off the front springs to do so as it is on GM cars. If anyone has done this it would be great to hear from you.
      Thanks
      Gas
      Not sure on a 61, but that's how I lowered the front on both my 58 and 65 with no ill effects to either car. I actually ended up cutting more than one coil, since that didn't drop them enough for me.

      Cheers

      Comment


      • #4
        The ends are easy to prove. Look at the bottom of your lower 'A' arm. Squarebird springs have an open 'end' which nests in a pocket. They only go in one way. The tops are flat, for that rubber piece.

        So, look. Surrounding the shock, is the spring perch. If it is totally flat, so is the spring. If it is formed to the coil end you will know immediately. - Dave
        My latest project:
        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
        --Lee Iacocca

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        • #5
          I've had as many as three coils cut from the front of mine and I recommend not cutting any more than one. One give a mild rake and does not adversely affect ride quality.

          The front springs on these are a bear and will destroy many spring compressors and possibly kill you while they are at it. Buy an OTC 7045B coil spring compressor, or similar.

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          • #6
            Here is the underneath view of my mount. It looks formed to a tangential end to me.



            Additionally, I found this in the manual, which seems to confirm that the bottom end is tangential and can therefore be cut.

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            • #7
              lowering

              Thanks to all, very informative replies. Will let you know how it turns out.

              Gas

              Comment


              • #8
                Removing front coils

                Hi finally starting to remove front coils of my 62 to cut one coil to lower it but noticing when it's on the hoist that the top A arm bottoms out on the frame and even if I disconnect the sway bar and upper ball joint the top A arm won't go any further. Am I missing something here? Any help is appreciated.
                Thanks
                Gas

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                • #9
                  The A arm stays on the car. You have to have a very good internal spring compressor to squeeze the spring enough so that it can be removed. What type compressor do you have?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    spring removal

                    Hi, I had a friend come over today with his spring compressor but it's the claw type and can hardly fit through the top shock opening, too difficult to work with. He suggested making one with 1/2" threaded bar and a couple of plates.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by gas62tbird View Post
                      Hi, I had a friend come over today with his spring compressor but it's the claw type and can hardly fit through the top shock opening, too difficult to work with. He suggested making one with 1/2" threaded bar and a couple of plates.
                      Yeah, external claw type will never get the job done on the springs, if the Bulletbird is anything like the 65 I did anyway.

                      You need the internal coil spring style tool. I went a did the free tool rental deal from Autozone and it made quick work of it for me.

                      Cheers
                      RustyNCA

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                      • #12
                        Take care - if a spring gets loose it can kill, main and wreck stuff big-time!

                        Regular spring compressors aren't up to it.
                        A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RustyNCa View Post
                          You need the internal coil spring style tool. I went a did the free tool rental deal from Autozone and it made quick work of it for me.
                          I tried that route and ruined the tool.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gas62tbird View Post
                            Hi, I had a friend come over today with his spring compressor but it's the claw type and can hardly fit through the top shock opening, too difficult to work with. He suggested making one with 1/2" threaded bar and a couple of plates.
                            Not to be a curmudgeon here but let me remind you of my earlier post:

                            Originally posted by Yadkin View Post
                            The front springs on these are a bear and will destroy many spring compressors and possibly kill you while they are at it. Buy an OTC 7045B coil spring compressor, or similar.
                            Online for about $150.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Yadkin View Post
                              I tried that route and ruined the tool.
                              Hmm, maybe my local store had a better tool than most carry?

                              I have to say, I've done alot of cars over the years and the springs in the 65 are without a doubt the longest I have ever seen in an uncompressed state.

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