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1963 Brakes

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  • #16
    When all four wheel cylinders ran off of one distribution block, they equalized by themselves.

    A common dual piston M/C splits the system so you need a combination proportioning valve to equalize both systems regardless of drum/drum, disk/drum or disk/disk. The valve also meters, to apply the rear brakes first, then the front. If a line ruptures, the spool shuts off the faulty system so you don't run out of brake fluid. The valve also energizes a warning light.

    Pirate Jack has good prices on brake components. - Dave
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

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    • #17
      I got my 9 inch booster from Pirate Jack for 80 bux and free shipping. With minor modifications to push rod connector I was able to use original booster bracket making the whole master cylinder brake booster assembly a bolt on setup.
      Attached Files

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      • #18
        Good job and good price, Tony. A brand new booster with warranty for $90 is a good deal and I love your fabrication. It looks simple and clean.

        If your brake lines are original, I hope you change them. Brake fluid is always clear when new. It also rarely ever gets changed so that brownish-red color in the reservoir comes from fifty years of rust INSIDE your brake lines, where you can not see the erosion. Now that you have a new master and booster, proper high brake pressure is restored to 'new' so your steel and rubber lines must be up to the task.

        Replacing brake lines is easier done than explained. Once you do your first line the rest go a lot easier. Start on the rear axle where the lines are short and straight. Use the old lines to practice your bending skills. - Dave
        My latest project:
        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
        --Lee Iacocca

        Comment


        • #19
          Your opinion

          I'm getting ready to start ordering parts to convert my '63 to disc brakes. I'd like to get some opinions on ordering the Scarebird kit ($320) versus Tom's Classic kit on eBay, either with booster and MC ($599) or without booster and MC ($375).

          I know Yadkin used the Tom's classic, and that one seems to be a more complete kit, for not significantly more money. But, I've seen lots of references to Scarebirds over the years, so am wondering if there is something inherently desireable about them. (Other than that he is somewhat local to me.)

          I will be needing a new booster and MC, as well, in case that sways anyone's opinion. I'm open to opinion on anything from functionality to appearance or anything in between.

          Thanks.

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          • #20
            According to the Scarebirds description you can use your standard 14" rims. I wasn't aware of that. If it is true then that can save you some money not having to buy new rims which you will need according to Tom's. Also the Scarebirds kit uses standard off the shelf parts. If Tom's goes out of business do you really know what brake pads or calipers and rotors to buy? Dollar for dollar it appears that Tom's kit is a better buy but there are other things to consider. I like being able to go to my local store and get parts rather than having to depend on Tom's to be around five years from now.

            John
            John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

            Thunderbird Registry #36223
            jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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            • #21
              Originally posted by jopizz View Post
              Also the Scarebirds kit uses standard off the shelf parts. If Tom's goes out of business do you really know what brake pads or calipers and rotors to buy? Dollar for dollar it appears that Tom's kit is a better buy but there are other things to consider. I like being able to go to my local store and get parts rather than having to depend on Tom's to be around five years from now.
              I asked that question of Tom's some time ago and their response was:
              79 malibu calipers and pads
              78 granada rotors

              Comment


              • #22
                It appears they are using the same or similar parts as Scarebird recommends. I question Scarebirds claim that you can use your stock rims. That really only leaves the mounting bracket. Scarebirds one piece bracket appears better made but I don't know for sure. You're probably going to add $90-100 to get the rotors, calipers and hoses to use the Scarebird kit which makes Tom's kit a much better buy. Maybe Steve (Yadkin) can chime in.

                John
                John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                Thunderbird Registry #36223
                jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                Comment


                • #23
                  The OEM wheel on my '60 has a center hole approx 2 9/16.
                  This did not fit over the Granada rotor.
                  Wheels on the '63 may be different???

                  I wound up using 80's Crown Vic 14 inch wheels to fit over the snout on my Granada rotors.






                  (also using Granada calipers and spindles.....only thing available 12 years ago when I converted my '60)

                  Hope that helps....

                  Eric

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jopizz View Post
                    I question Scarebirds claim that you can use your stock rims.
                    Originally posted by DKheld View Post
                    Wheels on the '63 may be different???
                    I don't have stock rims, but they are 14", so it's probably a crapshoot no matter what I choose.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by jopizz View Post
                      It appears they are using the same or similar parts as Scarebird recommends. I question Scarebirds claim that you can use your stock rims...
                      Originally posted by DKheld View Post
                      The OEM wheel on my '60 has a center hole approx 2 9/16.
                      This did not fit over the Granada rotor.
                      Wheels on the '63 may be different???...
                      We may be assuming too much about the Scarebird claims.

                      $320 is FAR too expensive for a couple brackets. I see the hubs are also included in the kit, but wait... Don't hubs normally come with rotors and at a much lower cost?

                      Someone may want to call Scarebird because it is possible that these are 10" rotors with turned down snouts to accommodate OEM wheels. That would justify the high price because SQUAREBIRD brackets are half the cost, at $170.

                      I personally do not like this approach because I want bolt-on rotors I can buy over the counter. I wouldn't go any smaller than 11" rotors, either. Hey, I'll buy new 'disk ready' 14" rims if that's what it takes. - Dave
                      My latest project:
                      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                      --Lee Iacocca

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                        Someone may want to call Scarebird because it is possible that these are 10" rotors with turned down snouts to accommodate OEM wheels.
                        Per oreillyauto.com, rotors for a 1997 Aerostar have an OD of 10.28".

                        And oddly, the rotor alone is $34-$36 each, or the rotor and hub assembly is $30-$31 each. Here are the listed specs on a rotor and hub assembly:
                        Disc Brake Rotor And Hub Assembly
                        Front Left
                        Rear Wheel Drive
                        Bolt Circle Diameter (In): 4.500 Inch
                        Bolt Circle Diameter (mm): 114.30mm
                        Number Of Bolt Holes: 5
                        Outside Diameter (In): 10.280 Inch

                        ADDITIONAL DETAILS
                        Center Hole Size (In): 2.330 Inch
                        Nominal Thickness (In): 0.875 Inch
                        Discard Thickness (In): 0.811 Inch
                        Overall Height (In): 4.130 Inch
                        Solid Or Vented: Vented
                        So if the Scarebird setup has turned down snouts, we'd expect the overall height to be less than 4.130", right?
                        Last edited by Ickaber; May 10th, 2017, 12:27 PM. Reason: Adding additional detail

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