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  • #16
    Barn find

    I will double check the number of teeth on the flywheel if deal goes through I still haven't heard back from the fellow I made the offer to. Another note I just wonder if the flywheel number of teeth are different why I couldn't use my flywheel and starter. Seems It should still bolt up to the crank okay. Do you agree

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    • #17
      Yes, you can reuse your starter and flywheel. I've had a number of '64's and they all have had the old starter and 153 tooth flywheel. If they went to the later starter and flywheel sometime in '64 I've never seen one.

      John
      John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

      Thunderbird Registry #36223
      jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

      http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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      • #18
        Thanks for all the support on this. Well after a dozen phone conversations and scheduling conflicts I am actually going to the guys garage and picking this engine and trans up if it is what it is supposed to be.
        Ron

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        • #19
          Okay guys. I have installed the engine and transmission and ready to fire it up. I seem to have a problem. I guess I need a tutorial on how the starter works. When I bolted the starter to the engine the starter drive teeth are mated with the flywheel teeth. ( Is this correct?). If so how does the drive work?... Does it spin the engine over and when it starts the drive then retracts away from the flywheel teeth?? I have 2 identical starters and when I bench test them they both spin with high RPMs but the drive doesnt retract. I want ed to get your feedback before I burn up the starter... Thanks in advance for any insight.
          Ron

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          • #20
            Ron, these are called 'Inertia' starters. They have NO reset spring. When the engine takes off, it actually kicks the starter's Bendix gear back (toward the nose).

            Later starters used a fork and an electromagnet to operate the Bendix. They have a separate wire to energize the electromagnet (also called a solenoid). Your starter has only ONE electrical connection, and it comes from the starter relay (or starter solenoid) mounted just after your battery. - Dave
            My latest project:
            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
            --Lee Iacocca

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            • #21
              Thank you Dave for the information. I really appreciate the quick response. I couldn't see how it would work otherwise but I was just so unsure of myself I needed to pass it by someone in the know. Thank you so much, sincerely Ron

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