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  • A matter of Timing

    Recommended timing for the 1960 FE 352 is between 2-10 degrees BTDC. I get it. I use 91-92 octane gasoline with timing set at 6*and the engine seems to miss a few beats at the top RPM under full throttle.

    Most prior discussions here seem to recommend the factory settings, except for one owner that thought 12-14* or so was superior for todays gasolines. Whatever works is the usual answer, but I tried 12* and it seems to run "livelier" with less miss.

    Running that Petronix electronic ignition, new cap and rotor, new Motorcraft wires, and Autolite 45 copper resister plugs set at .35. I have no clue if the carb was tuned for Denver where it came from, but I adjusted the mixture screws for max RPM.

    The engine runs terrific except for this full load max RPM hiccup.

    Dean

  • #2
    I like setting the timing at 8 or 9 degrees. I find I get better acceleration and it runs cooler. Anything higher and I get pinging and slow cranking when hot. Is the hiccup or hesitation when the secondary throttle kicks in. That's pretty normal.

    John
    John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

    Thunderbird Registry #36223
    jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jopizz View Post
      I like setting the timing at 8 or 9 degrees. I find I get better acceleration and it runs cooler. Anything higher and I get pinging and slow cranking when hot. Is the hiccup or hesitation when the secondary throttle kicks in. That's pretty normal.

      John
      John, I know knocking or pinging, and this isn't it. The engine has never pinged. It's like a miss or two, I hope and not pre-detonation, at full throttle only at "high" RPM just before she's ready to shift into a higher gear. Almost like it's "breaking up" just before shifting.

      The plugs look good, and like I said, everything is new. I'm thinking it occurred even before I put new parts on.- Dean

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      • #4
        It sounds like you adjusted your carburetor with a tach. I recommend a vacuum gauge instead. In my opinion that gives a much more accurate adjustment than using a tach.

        John
        John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

        Thunderbird Registry #36223
        jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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        • #5
          Interesting John. Can you be suggesting lean out conditions can cause misfire? This was a Denver area car and probably could run a leaner mixture than Ohio. I'll try the vacuum gauge. It's another tool I hadn't used since the 1990's like the timing light and dwell tach. - Dean

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          • #6
            Certainly a lean condition will cause a misfile on acceleration. Have you checked the float height. If they are too low that will also cause a misfire on acceleration.

            John
            John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

            Thunderbird Registry #36223
            jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jopizz View Post
              Certainly a lean condition will cause a misfile on acceleration. Have you checked the float height. If they are too low that will also cause a misfire on acceleration.

              John
              John, I read the manual which explains the 4100 float branch set. Is there a method to adjust the floats on the engine?. I have an electric fuel pump, so I shouldnít catch the car on fire. I thought it might be similar to a Holley, but it doesnít seem to be. - Dean

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              • #8
                You have to take the top off the carb to adjust the floats. It can be done on the car without making a mess. Just remove the air cleaner post, the screws and the choke clip.

                John
                John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                Thunderbird Registry #36223
                jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  The vacuum gauge is more sensitive than a dwell tach. I pulled 1/2 inch HG more adjusting the mixture screws. I canít say whatís normal, but I get a fairly steady18.

                  i recall my dadís 1972 Impala with a 350 2 bbl could pull a steady 20, while my 350 Z28 was an erratic 14. - Dean

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                  • #10
                    Certainly the type of cam you're running and wear and tear will affect the vacuum greatly. I was able to pull close to 22 on my last stock rebuilt 352.

                    John
                    John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                    Thunderbird Registry #36223
                    jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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                    • #11
                      I had something similar happen before, turns out the fuel pump was going out and I was running out of fuel

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jopizz View Post
                        Certainly the type of cam you're running and wear and tear will affect the vacuum greatly. I was able to pull close to 22 on my last stock rebuilt 352.

                        John
                        Both of you make me think. My engine was re-built at 72,000 miles and she has 85,000 now. It was a stock re-build .30 over. Plugs look good. Engine runs good except for a miss or two full throttle high RPM.

                        I can see where this could be anything from fuel pressure to jets to floats to worn distributor.

                        Dean

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                        • #13
                          Try separating the No.7 and No. 8 spark plug wires as much as possible. The fact that they are next to each other can cause a misfire if the wires are too close to one another. Page 2-6 in the 1960 shop manual shows the correct way the No.7 spark plug wire should be run.

                          John
                          Last edited by jopizz; April 18th, 2019, 12:24 PM.
                          John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                          Thunderbird Registry #36223
                          jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                          http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jopizz View Post
                            Try separating the No.7 and No. 8 spark plug wires as much as possible. The fact that they are next to each other can cause a misfire if the wires are too close to one another. Page 2-6 in the 1960 shop manual shows the correct way the No.7 spark plug wire should be run.

                            John
                            Iíll check it out. This crossed my mind when I saw 2 and 3 spark plug wires that want to touch. Thanks. - Dean

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                            • #15
                              I checked pages 2-6 of the 1960 shop manual. The picture had the spark plug wires separated over the valve covers about mid-engine. I thought that was fine until I opened my hood and the wire separators welded to the valve covers toward the engine front. I forgot that, and this configuration lends to the inner cylinder wires touching. I checked out other Squarebirds and 90% were configured like mine.

                              So I bought some extra spark plug wire separators and did the best I could at keeping the wires from touching near the plugs. We'll see. - Dean

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