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  • Brake Hose Surprise

    Frozen and fragile. That's really what we're dealing with on 50 plus year old cars. I've conceded the outcome on four projects I start on my 1960 Thunderbird. 1 in 4 projects work perfect, 2 in 4 work out, but not according to plan, and in 1 out of 4 I bust something else which many times is beyond anything I've done or have the facilities to complete.

    I planned to change the rear brake hose. Sprayed CRC and waited 30 minutes, supported it from behind, and held it down with vice gripes. Busted the junction block attachment to the differential, and twisted the brake lines pretty good while using a line wrench.

    BTW the Raybestos hose is made in China by Sunsong.

    So now while I'm getting a custom exhaust, I asked the shop to do the brake lines and transmission lines. Of course I will request their opinion on anything else while they're at this.

    I love working on cars, but 58 year old cars present a different set of circumstances that try my expertise and physical capabilities.

    Dean

  • #2
    Doesn't sound too much different than my own experiences! It is teaching me patience.
    http://www.tbirdregistry.com/viewdat...ryNumber=33517

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Dakota Boy View Post
      It is teaching me patience.
      Brake lines and hoses that are 50 yrs-old need to be replaced. The lines, hoses and fittings fuse together because steel brake lines rust from the inside, as evidenced by that brown-color in your M/C reservoir. Rubber hoses de-laminate from the inside, usually evidenced by a brake that won't release.

      Brake line cutting, bending and flaring is so easy anyone can do it. I encourage you to try. The secret to success is, using the proper brake line and a little patience that Greg mentioned.

      I use cunifer (Copper-Nickel-Iron alloy) brake line that never rusts along with premium brake parts, like brass IFF (inverted flare fitting) nuts and fittings because I live in the rust belt.

      This brake line allows me to use very inexpensive bending and flaring tools from Harbor Freight. The outcome is fantastic and very professional-looking.

      There is a learning curve but it only takes maybe two or three practice flares. The rest come out nicely. You can always use the old lines as a pattern but I don't any more. I think I did a youtube vid on this... Notice the simple hand tools I use including the bending pliers. I bend all the lines with those pliers, right on the spot. Yep, CLICK HERE

      BTW, you guys with '58 Squarebirds...
      Ford made some changes just before production started. That's why you have double hoses on the front brakes. It's a mistake that Ford corrected in 1959. I hope you re-plumb your new lines closer to the wheels so that only one hose is required on each side (like '59 & '60 Squarebirds). I know some folks want to keep their car 'stock' but perpetuating this mistake makes no sense to me. Besides, fewer and shorter rubber hoses makes sense in every brake system.

      When I change brake lines on a car, I try to avoid getting up and down a lot of times (because I'm old, too). I put the car on stands, give it a good 'shake' to make sure it's solid, then I spread out cardboard. I lay out all the tools and parts I need (let's say for the rear axle) and I don't get up again until the rear end is done. Simple hand tools is all I need and some patience. (You can get as fancy as you like, using power tools.) BTW, wiring electrical panels requires the same patience, so I get myself into that mindset, and I don't let anything distract me.

      Without rushing, you can re-plumb a car in one Saturday afternoon. The results are very rewarding and the cost is really low. - Dave
      My latest project:
      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
      --Lee Iacocca

      From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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      • #4
        New Exhaust, too

        My shop "almost" got the new exhaust finished save for an exhaust manifold leak. There's nothing that defeats a new exhaust system than an exhaust manifold leak. Now I can tell it was on the driver's side before, because I often wondered why this car sounded like the African Queen sometimes. I thought it was doughnut gasket. No such luck. By the way, they did complete an X pipe configuration. Very nice.

        Now I asked them to remove the manifold and find a shop to mill it flat.

        I believe I've read in our posts there isn't a long time gasket fix.

        Also, I asked the boys to adjust my shifter so I can select Low. Dave has warned me that the down side is the shift selector will have a problem with Park.

        Dean

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Deanj View Post
          Also, I asked the boys to adjust my shifter so I can select Low. Dave has warned me that the down side is the shift selector will have a problem with Park.

          Dean
          I'm not sure why you would need Low unless you are driving in snow or have some really steep hills. I prefer the security of having the shifter stay in Park.

          John
          John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

          Thunderbird Registry #36223
          jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

          http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jopizz View Post
            I'm not sure why you would need Low unless you are driving in snow or have some really steep hills. I prefer the security of having the shifter stay in Park.

            John
            Well of course John. I just like having things work.

            It's the same reason I installed windshield washers, power brakes, an alternator, a locking glove box, etc.

            I got one instrument light by the ignition switch I can't get to. Everything else is but that light and selecting Low works.

            Dean

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            • #7
              Job is finisned. Exhaust good, but milling the warped exhaust manifold didnít remedy the leak. It still needed a gasket.

              Brake lines replaced and good as transmission lines.

              Transmission selector canít be adjusted to make Low available as the problem is the worn selector lever.

              Good to have a quiet engine bay.

              Still only a fraction of dental implants.

              Dean

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Deanj View Post
                Job is finisned. Exhaust good, but milling the warped exhaust manifold didn’t remedy the leak. It still needed a gasket...
                There is something wrong with this. If the manifold is solid and flat, the eight bolts should have no problem making a good seal against the heads (evidenced by millions of Ford cars that came from the factory with no gasket).

                Your gear selector may have worn bushings that cause too much slop. They are located on the rod that connects the column to the trans arm (and they are cheap). - Dave
                My latest project:
                CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                --Lee Iacocca

                From: Royal Oak, Michigan

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                  There is something wrong with this. If the manifold is solid and flat, the eight bolts should have no problem making a good seal against the heads (evidenced by millions of Ford cars that came from the factory with no gasket).

                  Your gear selector may have worn bushings that cause too much slop. They are located on the rod that connects the column to the trans arm (and they are cheap). - Dave
                  My shop reported that the auto machine shop milled it twice to get it flat. My mechanic said the correct bolt torque wouldn't seal the leak. Is the problem in the heads?

                  I assume the bushing you speak of is hidden inside the end of the column on the selector arm? He said he held the arm and the play was inside the column.

                  Dean

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Deanj View Post
                    My shop reported that the auto machine shop milled it twice to get it flat. My mechanic said the correct bolt torque wouldn't seal the leak. Is the problem in the heads?

                    I assume the bushing you speak of is hidden inside the end of the column on the selector arm? He said he held the arm and the play was inside the column.

                    Dean
                    Have you checked the face of the exhaust ports on the head for defects?
                    The drivers side manifold on my Ď66 was cracked when I bought it in Ď05, I had it welded and used a grinder and large fine tooth file to get the face of the welded flange as flat as possible (I was too broke to get it machined at the time!) then used a fine smear of sealer around the port, so far no leaks.
                    My 2cents worth.
                    A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by scumdog View Post
                      Have you checked the face of the exhaust ports on the head for defects?
                      The drivers side manifold on my ‘66 was cracked when I bought it in ‘05, I had it welded and used a grinder and large fine tooth file to get the face of the welded flange as flat as possible (I was too broke to get it machined at the time!) then used a fine smear of sealer around the port, so far no leaks.
                      My 2cents worth.
                      I love those stories. I saw someone in Squarebird Forum used some "Hi-temp Lab Metal" as a sealer.

                      My guy used a metal gasket which he's warranteed for a year as a matter of everything he did. Looks all business. Too bad the milling didn't work. Too bad he didn't ignore me about how these don't use gaskets, and he just put this gasket on.

                      Never owned a car in the day that leaked from the exhaust manifold at the exhaust port. Plenty leaked at the outlet where the donut goes because of wear, cracked manifold, or busted studs.

                      Now the car doesn't sound like the African Queen.

                      Dean

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