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  • #16
    Originally posted by Frango100 View Post
    I will not change the starter motor, only the stud...
    Sorry, I misunderstood. I thought you were getting a starter motor that included a positive post.

    If you ordered #P 11102A Starter Motor Field Terminal from Larry's, it is a kit that includes the stud and all necessary insulators and nuts.

    This is a common part that breaks because it is made of soft copper and people torque far more than 15-ft/lbs. Many torque wrenches don't start that low. Another cause: Do not let the terminal bear the brunt of vibration. Use a clamp on the engine block to support your starter motor wire. The 352 FE has a conveniently tapped hole on the passenger's side, just about in the middle of the block below the exhaust manifold. I use that one to strap the wire, with a 'cushion' around the wire made of tape or rubber. I also leave extra wire between the solenoid and engine for vibration. - Dave.
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

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    • #17
      All good suggestions Dave and John, I will follow that. Thanks.
      sigpicFrank
      1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
      Thunderbird registry #61670

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      • #18
        Soon i will receive the starter motor stud and can re-assemble the starter. There is quite some axial play on the armature shaft. Both front and rear thrust washers are in place. Is it normal to have quite some play on there? I couldnīt find any reference on this.
        sigpicFrank
        1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
        Thunderbird registry #61670

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        • #19
          So the stud arrived this week and I re-assembled the starter motor. Did a quick test on the bench and it worked well.
          Re-installed it this morning and didnīt use the electrical fuel pump, just to test the starter a bit longer. It was working very well with a lot more power then i remember it had before, but of course the brushes where worn to their limits.
          Then i used the electrical fuel pump to fill the bowls and wanted to start the engine. Surprise, nothing. I can hear the starter relay and a noise from the starter that its trying to do something, but no rotation.
          I turned the crankshaft by hand, just to be sure that there was no hydraulic lock in one of the cylinders (even though i would not know why that should suddenly happen), but it was free to rotate.
          Took the starter of again and removed the band, all looks normal. Didnīt had the time to continue the trouble shooting, but tomorrow morning i will put it directly on the battery again and see what it does.
          Will be continued.....
          sigpicFrank
          1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
          Thunderbird registry #61670

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          • #20
            Problem solved. The paper like insulation wrapping around one of the field coils was damaged and the field wire was touching the housing. The insulation wrapping is very brittle after so many years and breaks easily. I put some insulation tape on it for now, but would like to restore it as it was.
            Any ideas what to put on it or maybe best to take it to a professional for the right treatment?
            sigpicFrank
            1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
            Thunderbird registry #61670

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Frango100 View Post
              ...I put some insulation tape on it for now, but would like to restore it as it was.
              Any ideas what to put on it or maybe best to take it to a professional for the right treatment?
              Frank, there is nothing technical inside your starter motor. Ford used simple cardboard and shellac on windings and Micarta between commutator segments. It doesn't take much to hold back 12-volts but then there is heat involved.

              Vinyl tape and rubber are terrible in heat. I like using thin cardboard, like shirt board, with silicone pressed into it. Silicone II (made by GE) works well as it insulates electricity, heat and cold. A thin coat is all you need because even if the cardboard gets brittle and breaks the silicone will keep it together, much the same as shellac did back in the day only better. You notice red paint used on the inside of the housing in my pictures. That is Glyptol paint made by GE, used before they invented Silicone II. A small tube on Sinicone II is all you need. - Dave
              My latest project:
              CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

              "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
              --Lee Iacocca

              Comment


              • #22
                Thanks Dave. What is Silicone II, never seen that here.
                sigpicFrank
                1958 T-Bird "Trovão Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
                Thunderbird registry #61670

                Comment


                • #23
                  It's basically bathtub calk made by General Electric.


                  This product has a lifetime warranty so you know it's good stuff. It comes in white or clear. There may be other colors as well.
                  You can get this in smaller sizes. Once the tube is opened the product starts to cure. I have tried sealing it well but after about a month or so it cures too far into the tube. - Dave
                  My latest project:
                  CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                  "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                  --Lee Iacocca

                  Comment

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