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This years plans?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by sidewalkman View Post
    Behind the back seat, on the doors under the door panels, firewall, trunk floor, underside of trunk. Pretty much any place you have rattles it helps, but under the carpet is the best, gets rid of road noise and helps with the heat from exhaust pipes
    I tried, and succeeded somewhat, with putting Hushmat or Roadkill under some of the interior carpet. I laid some in the trunk and behind the door panels. It's pretty much impractical to get everything totally covered, so I covered a sensible amount of floor and trunk just reduce some heat and maybe noise.

    The door panels are regrettably a pain in the can. At 59 years old the clips and vinyl are so fragile that I wish I hadn't removed these in the first place. Brittle vinyl on the corners breaks into shards with little force. Clips can't find a solid board slot in every position. All that just to reduce the rattling between the panels and the door frame-because what I installed isn't going to make these a sound barrier.

    I hate to say what should be fun to work on becomes a nightmare. I sure hope this Dynamat alternative has the qualities it purports to have.

    Dean

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    • #32
      I went thru installing Dynamat when I had the dash out. Firewall, toeboard, kick panels, etc. And it does seem to help road noise.
      But I think I got more heat reduction out of exhaust pipe shields. They're just 8X18 aluminum that is bent half-round and have three tabs cut on each end (like the block letter 'E'). Those are bent into legs that make the heat shield stand off the pipe about an inch, maybe less. Hose clamps hold them in place.
      I remember driving the bird home to IN across the desert you couldn't touch the chrome strip on the console. Not 'original' tho.

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      • #33
        Not original? The more and more I fool with this car the less original it is. I still like things stock if not original, but many repairs cry out for upgrades and/or changes. I've given up and realize the next owner either likes it or lumps it.

        Dean

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        • #34
          I guess I'd say that's where I'm at. Stock appearance but not perfectly original. Besides, who can see heat shields? Or remote locks. I hid the cruise control in the ashtray.
          And I never think about the next owner or resale at all. Upgrades are for driveability, safety, convenience and comfort, in my world. The car was already far from original when we got it. The engine was replaced. The interior was original looking, but all sewn. Not heat-sealed on door panels and seat backs. Too good to replace, certainly. But not strictly original.
          Have fun with your car and enjoy your personal improvements. But that's me.
          No offense to the purists. I like seeing those cars. Lotta work goes into that end of the car hobby. Gotta respect that. Mike

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          • #35
            I by no stretch of the imagination am a purist, my car, my way. I want the interior to look pretty original, but I've done things like green LED replacing all the dash bulbs and I'm hiding a Bluetooth stereo.
            Scott
            South Delta, BC, Canada
            1960 White T-Bird, PS, PB that's it
            Red Leather Interior!
            www.squarebirds.org/users/sidewalkman
            Thunderbird Registry #61266
            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_g...ibrary/trl.htm

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            • #36
              Since this string is about this year's plans, I'll say I have plans to get some front end work done. I have control arm bushings that need to be replaced. I think the shop that put them in twisted them up by tightening them before the car was on all fours. They're only a few years old.
              I've been asking friends about good shops, but no luck so far.
              I'd like to get it done during winter and be ready for next year.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by bygrace View Post
                ...I think the shop that put them in twisted them up by tightening them before the car was on all fours. They're only a few years old...
                I'm sorry this happened to you. Bushings should last at least 100K-miles. Bushing failure always shows up after the warranty period expired.

                Mechanics rarely read the Shop Manual before installing bushings. It's all in there, too. It might be a good idea to ASK the mechanic how he is going to do the job before he starts. If his answers aren't right, move on to the next mechanic. I realize that many times the customer never meets the mechanic. I always do. - Dave
                My latest project:
                CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                --Lee Iacocca

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                • #38
                  Yeah, it really bums me out. And like you say, the bushings don't fail quick enough to take them back on warranty. We used it the rest of the summer and it feathered one of my Cokers. One problem creates another, right?
                  And I even took them the shop manual. Told them no spring compressor was needed, etc. They acted interested. I dunno.... Gotta find a good shop. I'm asking guys I know for a recommendation.

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