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This I didn't know untill yesterday Oil additive

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  • This I didn't know untill yesterday Oil additive

    Ive been reading about a Lawsuit involving Dollar store oil damaging newer cars, Found out that for our Older cars we need that oil. But mostly the oil we buy today needs to have the Zinc additive mixed in on the Oil change
    Thank God for my friends at O'Reilly's
    They are a tremendous help to me

  • #2
    Indeed our flat tappet engines need the Zinc for extra lubrification. Im using Motul mineral classic oil 20W50, which is specially made for 1950-1970 engines.
    Last edited by Frango100; November 27th, 2016, 07:17 PM.
    sigpicFrank
    1958 T-Bird "Trovo Rosa" - "Rose Thunder"
    Thunderbird registry #61670

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    • #3
      Yes definitely need oil with zinc for these older gals. Go to the main page and hit the SEARCH button and type in the box "Zinc Additive" and read the many threads regarding this topic by our members. A good read to understand the importance.
      Dano Calgary,Alberta Canada
      Thunderbird Registry
      58HT #33317
      60 HT (Sold )

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dan Leavens View Post
        Yes definitely need oil with zinc for these older gals. Go to the main page and hit the SEARCH button and type in the box "Zinc Additive" and read the many threads regarding this topic by our members. A good read to understand the importance.
        Thanks I will. I did type in Oil additive and then just "Oil" and got no results

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        • #5
          I would say: Bull. There's enough zinc in today's oil for flat tappet cams unless you're breaking in a new, re-built engine, or maybe racing. You'd see an entire market dedicated to selling zinc enriched oil if it were dire. I believe zinc has been decreased in motor oils because it decreases catalytic converter life. So, I wouldn't sweat the zinc additive.

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          • #6
            Lots of discussion & cussin on the net about zinc in oil for old cars. Seems as though it is very complex issue - everyone has to decide for themselves. For me a $10 bottle of ZDDP additive is cheap insurance for my annual oil change.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Joe Johnston View Post
              Lots of discussion & cussin on the net about zinc in oil for old cars. Seems as though it is very complex issue - everyone has to decide for themselves. For me a $10 bottle of ZDDP additive is cheap insurance for my annual oil change.
              Thats my thoughts on it, Plus how many times a year are you going to change oul Maybe twice for me no more than ill be driving mine

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              • #8
                Our engines were designed and built for oils of that time period. Since then, oil and fuel formulations have changed over a dozen times.

                ZDDP is the main ingredient that is missing in today's oil. It is mainly zinc and phosphorous which is used up by flat tappets. So if you start out with 1,500 parts per million (ppm), that number decreases as the engine runs.

                Most of the engines built today don't have flat tappets, they are roller follower or roller lifter. ZDDP attacks catalytic converters, so no ZDDP.

                Changing to roller lifters wasn't cheap to do for the car manufacturers but they did it to meet environment EPA spec's.

                The bottom line is... sadly, our engines simply don't meet today's fuels, oils, compressions, etc. Many members de-tune their timing to lower engine heat at the expense of fuel economy. ZDDP can be found in oils with viscosity of at LEAST 40 (in the numbers), like racing oil or diesel (Shell Rotella) oil such as 15W-40. I rebuilt my Y-block with hardened exhaust valve seats, required for gasohol. I'm stuck with flat tappets so I use 15W-40 and I change it every 3,000 miles JUST to maintain the ZDDP concentration. Now I take my classic on long trips without hesitation. If your engine is stock, it won't have longevity using today's pump gas or common oil. - Dave
                My latest project:
                CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                --Lee Iacocca

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                • #9
                  I use Shell Rotella diesel oil in my flathead and a off brand motor (making plans for its replacement).

                  A engine builder introduced me to the Rotella.
                  Keith
                  Sedalia, Mo.
                  sigpic
                  CLICK HERE for Keith's web site

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, Rotella will cost over $32 for 5 quarts. For less money there's synthetic oil. We can greatly disagree over which oil would be most appropriate and the "safest". However, I've seen more written about the superiority of synthetic than extra zinc.

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                    • #11
                      Synthetic oil was developed for engines that get very hot, those with flat tappets AND turbo chargers, like aircraft and diesel trucks. Conventional oil breaks down under high heat.

                      Synthetic never boasted better lubricity than conventional oil but it can be used longer between changes. So, if your engine is naturally aspirated, there is no advantage in buying synthetic over conventional oil.

                      Don't confuse ZDDP with synthetic or conventional oil because ZDDP is used as an anti-wear lubricant that is added to oils and grease. ZDDP appears in different concentrations depending on the intended use by the oil manufacturer.

                      If your engine requires ZDDP, carefully scrutinize the oil BEFORE you use it. Many oil manufacturers will not offer their ZDDP numbers (like STP, although I know it is high in ZDDP). ZDDP is mainly used as a 'last ditch effort' in places that get hard metal-to-metal contact and where oiling methods may be scant (like camshaft lobes). ZDDP is 'sacrificial' in these areas meaning, it gets consumed so the concentration goes down.

                      Find oil with numbers that are at LEAST 1,500-PPM ZDDP. The EPA has left racing oil with viscosity of 40 or greater, alone. This fits nicely in with my Harley-Davison engine as it is air-cooled and it has flat tappets. - Dave
                      My latest project:
                      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                      --Lee Iacocca

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                      • #12
                        So im ok if I just use a straight 30 weight with the Zinc, this bird wont fly more than a couple thousand miles a year if that

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by olevet View Post
                          So im ok if I just use a straight 30 weight with the Zinc, this bird wont fly more than a couple thousand miles a year if that
                          30W is too thick when your engine is cold, which will be a large percentage of time since you won't be driving it a lot. Use a multi-weight like your owners manual says to.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Deanj View Post
                            Yeah, Rotella will cost over $32 for 5 quarts. For less money there's synthetic oil. We can greatly disagree over which oil would be most appropriate and the "safest". However, I've seen more written about the superiority of synthetic than extra zinc.
                            Synthetic oil doesn't have the viscosity modifying additives that conventional oils need to obtain a multi-viscosity rating. The additives in conventional oil break down over time which is why the change interval is less than with synthetics. Zinc is not part of that equation. If you have flat tappets you should use an oil that has zinc in it.

                            My local hardware store sells Brad Penn oil for $8/ quart, designed for old cars with flat tappets. It also has an anti-rust additive that the military specifies for its vehicles, for long term storage. For 5 quarts you'll spend an extra $10 every year, but that is cheap insurance.

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                            • #15
                              I buy Shell Rotella at Menards in Sedalia Mo. for $12.97 a gallon.
                              Keith
                              Sedalia, Mo.
                              sigpic
                              CLICK HERE for Keith's web site

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