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Lift with 2-post, 4-post or Race Ramps

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  • #16
    That makes my skin crawl. This guy knows nothing about distributing weight for a safe lift. The lift's mounting bolts cannot take that kind of stress.

    Here are the stands I refer to: CLICK HERE
    As the web site explains, one goes under each end of the car.
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

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    • #17
      Not sure anyone can truly answer your actual question, but 2 post lifts have been around way longer than squarebirds.

      It seems unlikely to me that Ford designed a chassis that could survive the combination of dynamic forces from the drivetrain and going down the road, yet deform beyond yield from sitting on a lift. That's assuming the vehicle is lifted @ the points ford recommends (which may be the real question).
      59-430-HT

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      • #18
        yet deform beyond yield from sitting on a lift. That's assuming the vehicle is lifted @ the points ford recommends (which may be the real question).
        How true!

        In the late 60's and early 70's I killed time at a local Texaco station while going to college. Picked up a few bucks on short wrecker calls and other odd jobs. We had a Mustang convertible in for front brake work and had the whole front picked up by a big air powered bumper jack that lifted from under both bumper mounts. As it went up we saw the top sag and the doors were impossible to open! Yes proper lifting is essential - especially as a car gets a few years on it.

        Me? I still will take a 4 post drive on for my use - but everyone is different!

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Joe Johnston View Post
          How true!

          In the late 60's and early 70's I killed time at a local Texaco station while going to college. Picked up a few bucks on short wrecker calls and other odd jobs. We had a Mustang convertible in for front brake work and had the whole front picked up by a big air powered bumper jack that lifted from under both bumper mounts. As it went up we saw the top sag and the doors were impossible to open! Yes proper lifting is essential - especially as a car gets a few years on it.

          Me? I still will take a 4 post drive on for my use - but everyone is different!
          Luckily, I have one of each. There are things you cannot really do on a 2 post (or the job is harder).

          1. Wheel alignment, even a hacked home job is difficult on the floor.
          2. Aligning doors or replacement door strikers (again, can do on floor if you don't mind bending over for hours on end).
          3. New exh, as susp hangs down and you never really know if it fits right until you put it back on the ground.
          4. Front springs with lower control arm. Really no good place to jack under control arm enough to compress spring, without lifting car off front pad(s) on a 2 post.
          5. Suspension on solid axle. Much easier with axles sitting on runways and controlling height of body with center jack.
          6. Some body work. Can't remove some front fenders as rear lower bolt is right where front arm is on some asymmetric 2 posts.
          7. Oil change on certain cars. Fox bodies push bottom of sway bar forward when susp droops, putting it right under front drain plug. Then oil runs down both sides of sway bar and all over floor. (nit picking I know, but it is what it is).


          2 post still best for trans/engine work/pulls and easiest for brake and tire removal.
          59-430-HT

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          • #20
            So as long as im careful the two post will work OK with out distorting the Unibody?
            I have the floor reinforced with 12 inch deep concrete and rebar crossed at 12 in also for about an 8 ft square area.

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            • #21
              Yes no problem, front on the short arms. I usually lift from the front of the front torque boxes and rear of the rear torque boxes.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Yadkin View Post
                Yes no problem, front on the short arms. I usually lift from the front of the front torque boxes and rear of the rear torque boxes.
                Thanks.
                Its still a couple months out.

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                • #23
                  I'm starting to like these XL Race Ramps:

                  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...g=flatsixes-20

                  A co-worker has a set. Very nice & He told be they sell "stackable" ones too!!

                  -Jon in TX.
                  sigpic
                  The 1960 Ford Thunderbird. The WORLD'S most wanted car....

                  VTCI Member#6287.

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                  • #24
                    Interesting. Expensive for what they are. Huge, so storage needs to be considered.

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                    • #25
                      The lift points are in the shop manual, I believe.
                      DGS (aka salguod)
                      1960 Convertible - Raven Black, Red leather
                      www.salguod.net

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