Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

One wire alternator voltage gauge option

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • One wire alternator voltage gauge option

    Just finished up re-wiring my 59 and getting ready to re-install my engine. I went with a 130 amp one wire alt, and while trying to come up with gauge options, I found this. I thought it was a great alternative because I didn't want to add a gauge in or under the dash, and this one also has a usb port for charging phones and such.


  • #2
    What gauge wire did you use with the 130-amp alt? Did you fuse it? What size fuse?

    Where did you find FE brackets for your alternator?
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

    Comment


    • #3
      That's pretty neat.

      I like the Clockometer too

      Eric

      Comment


      • #4
        I made one of those cigar lighter meters some months back and sent it to johng. Then I found them on eBay for ~$2.50 (buy it now including shipping to my door).

        For two bucks I can't buy the meter or the plug. I agree that this is a great troubleshooting item for battery status. Everyone should have one in their box and use it when you suspect troubles. - Dave
        My latest project:
        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
        --Lee Iacocca

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
          What gauge wire did you use with the 130-amp alt? Did you fuse it? What size fuse?

          Where did you find FE brackets for your alternator?
          Well I was planning on just running a 10 ga wire to the battery.
          The car had an alt already on it when I got it, although I greatly modified the upper bracket when I had everything apart to make it look more like it belonged on there. The top mount was a lot bigger with un-needed holes in it that I cut out.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
            I made one of those cigar lighter meters some months back and sent it to johng. Then I found them on eBay for ~$2.50 (buy it now including shipping to my door).

            For two bucks I can't buy the meter or the plug. I agree that this is a great troubleshooting item for battery status. Everyone should have one in their box and use it when you suspect troubles. - Dave
            Yea, I think they are pretty cool, and the one I got transitions colors from blue when all is well to yellow when it is questionable and red when it drops around to around 8 volt's, so you can see in a glance how the system is doing.

            Comment


            • #7
              Larry, I want to offer friendly but serious advice. #10AWG is good for 30-amps, safely. Your new alt will deliver 130-amps but it will burn up a #10 wire. Back in the day, #10 was ok because that is all generators put out.

              This is a different ball game. Your wire needs to be at least three times bigger than #10, which brings us to #2 AWG. Furthermore I suggest you use WELDING WIRE because it is super flexible copper stranded wire.

              Alternators are solid state devices because they have diodes and SCRs. When they fail, they usually short to ground. That means your alt wire will try to carry everything your battery has, and dump it to ground as fast as possible. For this you need a fuse. We don't want the wire to be your fuse.

              A 150-amp fuse will work very nicely. Mount it on your fender apron between the battery connection and your alternator. If you need a good source for these components, let me know.

              I absolutely love that you are using an alternator large enough to run a cooling fan and whatever else you want to run. I also have a 130 alt. mounted to my Y-block. The first rule in 'electrical' is, the supply MUST meet the demand. You have done that very well. Now, let's protect the system. - Dave
              My latest project:
              CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

              "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
              --Lee Iacocca

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                Larry, I want to offer friendly but serious advice. #10AWG is good for 30-amps, safely. Your new alt will deliver 130-amps but it will burn up a #10 wire. Back in the day, #10 was ok because that is all generators put out.

                This is a different ball game. Your wire needs to be at least three times bigger than #10, which brings us to #2 AWG. Furthermore I suggest you use WELDING WIRE because it is super flexible copper stranded wire.

                Alternators are solid state devices because they have diodes and SCRs. When they fail, they usually short to ground. That means your alt wire will try to carry everything your battery has, and dump it to ground as fast as possible. For this you need a fuse. We don't want the wire to be your fuse.


                A 150-amp fuse will work very nicely. Mount it on your fender apron between the battery connection and your alternator. If you need a good source for these components, let me know.

                I absolutely love that you are using an alternator large enough to run a cooling fan and whatever else you want to run. I also have a 130 alt. mounted to my Y-block. The first rule in 'electrical' is, the supply MUST meet the demand. You have done that very well. Now, let's protect the system. - Dave
                Thanks Dave. I will admit that I am pretty much a novice when it comes to electrical. This is only the second car I have re-wired. The last one was a 48 chry and I went with pretty much the same harness but only a 100 amp alt. I never had any issues with that one, and I used an electric fan on it from a Lincoln mark VIII.
                So you are suggesting to run 2 awg from the alt to the battery with a 150 amp (inline fuse)? The wire is no problem, I am pretty sure I can get that at lowes. What source can I get a fuse like that at? I really appreciate the advise Dave, thanks.
                EDIT: Are talking about something like this Dave? http://www.ebay.com/itm/150-AMP-ANL-...item5d46d0a209
                Last edited by Larry; March 29th, 2014, 08:43 AM. Reason: Add a question

                Comment


                • #9
                  Most auto stores have 150 amp fuses. Here's one from NAPA. This is similar to what I use. I have it bolted to the battery post of the solenoid and then to the alternator wire.
                  http://www.napaonline.com/Catalog/Ca...138_0361138911

                  John
                  Last edited by jopizz; March 29th, 2014, 09:27 AM.
                  John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                  Thunderbird Registry #36223
                  jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                  http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    OK, I got it. I hope to have this all buttoned up and back on the road by the end of the week. Can not hardly wait to here her fire up again. Compared to what I had before, two gouged up cylinders with a two bbl, and a cracked transmission case, she should run like a scalded dog.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The eBay fuse with holder and pigtail for $12.60 is a good price because of free shipping. I like fuses to be in a separate holder, just to keep mechanical stresses off the fuse lugs. They're also kept cleaner and easier to change.

                      You can get fancy by adding a flashing red 12-volt LED across the fuse. It will only shine when the fuse blows (which should be never, but a visual indication lures your eyes to the problem).

                      Here's the deal... if you blow this fuse, something is really wrong. The fuse disconnects your alternator electrically, allowing the battery to keep any remaining charge to get your car home or to a garage.

                      Go to an electrical supply store (a contractor's store) and ask for welding wire. They sell it by the foot. Tell them it's for your classic Thunderbird. If the guy will crimp ring terminals (lugs) on the ends for you, tell him how long you need it. If he cannot do it at the store, any of the contractors will probably fabricate it for a very nominal charge. You buy two lugs and the wire, and they will crimp it for you. - Dave
                      My latest project:
                      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                      --Lee Iacocca

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks Dave. I already have everything I need, bought the fuse from ebay and picked up the wire and lugs from Atwoods. I already had a lug crimper from wiring my batteries for some solar panels I used in my cabin. So I should be set and thanks again for the advise.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Remember to mount this heavy wire to something solid on both ends. Don't allow the lugs to be subjected to vibrations. You can tyrap the alt end to the alt bracket, leave extra wire between the engine and the fender apron, then bolt the wire to steel a few inches before it terminates at the fuse. Those insulated steel straps work well. - Dave
                          My latest project:
                          CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                          "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                          --Lee Iacocca

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                            Remember to mount this heavy wire to something solid on both ends. Don't allow the lugs to be subjected to vibrations. You can tyrap the alt end to the alt bracket, leave extra wire between the engine and the fender apron, then bolt the wire to steel a few inches before it terminates at the fuse. Those insulated steel straps work well. - Dave
                            Will do. Thanks

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X