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Tranny coolant line routing

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  • Tranny coolant line routing

    The rubber hoses on my transmission coolant lines were soggy and leaking, so I bought a new set. I planned on labeling which line connected to where on the radiator, but forgot about it and cut the rubber hoses off to make it easier to pull the old steel lines out. Ooof!

    Does anyone know which forward and rear line on the tranny connects to the upper and lower connection on the radiator?

    Thanks
    1959 Thunderbird - Thunderbird Registry #46052

  • #2
    coolant lines

    I don't think it makes a difference

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree, it doesn't matter. How much pressure can the radiator take? Well, these are very low pressure lines.
      My latest project:
      CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

      "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
      --Lee Iacocca

      Comment


      • #4
        I believe the original lines only fit one way. I'm not sure if the repros are made to the same specs.

        John
        John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

        Thunderbird Registry #36223
        jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          Okay, since my car is up on jacks, I climbed under to check it out.
          The cooler line that is attached to the top radiator tank connection is connected to the transmission fitting closest to the engine. The lower radiator connection is connected to the transmission at the rear of the transmission.
          Hope this helps.
          Doesn't look like the lines would be interchangeable.
          Also, this is for a 352 eng. with cruisematic.
          Nylel

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tbird1044 View Post
            Also, this is for a 352 eng. with cruisematic.
            Nylel
            Thanks!

            The new lines came in 4 steel pieces: 2 long ones to go from the tranny to the front, and 2 different short ones to come off the radiator. I connected them with some hoses. I was hoping they would've come with crimped rubber hoses ready to go, but this worked out fine.
            1959 Thunderbird - Thunderbird Registry #46052

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
              I agree, it doesn't matter...
              When I plumb transmission, fuel or brake lines, I cut, bend and flare my own to length. Tubing bends easily, is cheap, and each line only takes a few minutes to make.

              When done, I don't use any rubber hoses (except on fuel lines). That is what I meant when I said the lines can be connected to either radiator port. Of course, when you buy pre-bent lines they come as a specific system.

              Glad you are happy with your new lines. - Dave
              My latest project:
              CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

              "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
              --Lee Iacocca

              Comment


              • #8
                Dave:
                Since the radiator is mounted rigid to the frame and the engine and trans have rubber mounts, allowing it to move under load, wouldn't you want the rubber hoses, in the cooler lines, to prevent torque movement against the radiator? The steel lines are pretty long and maybe compensate. Since the trans cooler lines run at such a low pressure, the only down side I see to using some rubber lines is a clamp coming loose to cause a leak.
                Nyles

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tbird1044 View Post
                  Dave:
                  Since the radiator is mounted rigid to the frame and the engine and trans have rubber mounts, allowing it to move under load, wouldn't you want the rubber hoses, in the cooler lines, to prevent torque movement against the radiator?..
                  Good question, Nyles. I thought the same way until I saw 'the big picture' (examples of other Ford car setups from different years). Turns out, the only reason I can think of for using rubber hoses is, ease of assembly.
                  Check out these examples:





                  While these examples are not specific to T-bird, they do cross many years and engine types. ("1962/" means from '62 through the end of this 1962-65 catalog.)
                  Why does the '62 6-cyl Fairlane have rubber hose on only one line while the 8-cyl has it on both? The 6-cyl Falcon has no rubber. So, this can go either way. If you want rubber, go for it. If not, it really isn't necessary. I like these illustrations because they show mounting details. - Dave
                  My latest project:
                  CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                  "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                  --Lee Iacocca

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                    Turns out, the only reason I can think of for using rubber hoses is, ease of assembly. - Dave
                    Dave,

                    I think you're right on. Trying to fish the transmission lines on these cars is hard enough. Without the rubber it's next to impossible.

                    John
                    John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                    Thunderbird Registry #36223
                    jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A local garage up the street let me use his tubing bender for free to tweak the lines in several places. It certainly needed a little bit here and there. No leaks now, so everything up front should stay dry.

                      And I feel better now having new upper/lower radiator hoses. The old ones were not only soggy, but barely clamped on, about the width of the hose clamp. New belts, too.
                      1959 Thunderbird - Thunderbird Registry #46052

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by V-John View Post
                        ...It certainly needed a little bit here and there...
                        Now you know why I bend my own.
                        Store-bought setups nearly always need tweaking and they're expensive (tubing is cheap). Glad to hear your lines and hoses are all good with no leaks. - Dave
                        My latest project:
                        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                        --Lee Iacocca

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Like I mentioned before, I thought they would already have the rubber hoses CRIMPED on them for the price I paid.
                          1959 Thunderbird - Thunderbird Registry #46052

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            John, do they even do that? I mean, I don't think I have ever seen trans lines with crimped hoses. I think it's because these lines are not high pressure. - Dave
                            My latest project:
                            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                            --Lee Iacocca

                            Comment

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