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What's the name of the color?

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  • What's the name of the color?

    Back in the '60s, I owned a '58 T-bird. I later owned a '60 model, which I found even more beautiful. I now am trying to find a '60 T-bird again, and will repaint it the color of my first love, the '58 model.

    But I'm not sure what the color was named. It had a yellow/beige body, about the color of a manilla folder, and a white top. The official colors for the '58 includes a "Desert Beige" and a "Casino Cream." (Casino Cream?? Who comes up with these names?) Either one may be what I'm looking for. I have also heard that there was a "Moroccan Ivory" which has been described as yellowish. It is possible that my car was painted in a non-standard color. Does anyone know more about what the color of my car was?

  • #2
    Ours is Corinthian White.. I say it looks like Vanilla Ice Cream. When parked next to our white Dodge, the Bird looks slightly yellow/tan.

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    • #3
      Anders yes Moroocan Ivory is a yellowish colour. See my 60 in the TBird registry to see the actualk colour.
      Dano Calgary,Alberta Canada
      Thunderbird Registry
      58HT #33317
      60 HT (Sold )

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      • #4
        1958 CHIP CHART (also 1960)

        http://mustangattitude.com/cgi-bin/c...r=1958&rows=50

        This should help...

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        • #5
          There are often color chips out for sale on Ebay. I bought myself some a few years ago.
          http://www.ebay.com/itm/1958-FORD-TH...item4d0bbee0d4
          sigpic..."Lil darling Ruth"
          http://www.tbirdregistry.com/#33158

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          • #6
            What's the name of the color?

            Casino Cream was the name of the light yellow paint used on 1958 and 1959 Tbirds, such as my Yellow Rose when I bought her. In 1960, they dropped Casino Cream and added Moroccan Ivory, a lighter still yellow color and Yosemite Yellow. The latter looks to be very close to the 1958-1959 Casino Cream. Your '58 was probably a Casino Cream and white top. Here are the Squarebirds paint displays, and a picture of my '59 Casino Cream and white top before she became The Yellow Rose Of Texas.
            Attached Files

            Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
            '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
            "It's Hip To Be Square"
            Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

            Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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            • #7
              Funny. I have the same color samples as you Ray, and my Grenadier Red is also missing. I was disapointed at the time as my car is Grenadier Red, and that´s what I was looking for
              Anyway, she will be green and silver in the future
              I realy like that "Surf Blue Poly" from the 1959 Spring color area on the ´60 sheet. And what a name: Surf Blue
              sigpic..."Lil darling Ruth"
              http://www.tbirdregistry.com/#33158

              Comment


              • #8
                What's the name of the color?

                We have had this discussion before regarding Torch Red and Grenadier Red on '58 Squarebirds. As stated in this link, the '58 color chart shows Torch Red and the back listing shows Grenadier Red instead.

                http://www.squarebirds.org/vbulletin...p?t-10178.html

                This link also show Grenadier Red and not Torch Red.

                http://automotivemileposts.com/paint1958tbird.html

                Another link below also shows the same thing. In 1958, Grenadier Red was also a Lincoln color. Here is the '58 Paint listing showing Grenadier Red.
                Attached Files

                Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
                '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
                "It's Hip To Be Square"
                Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

                Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

                http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

                Comment


                • #9
                  'Color' is one of the hardest thing to match. At Manufacturing Development (Ford) we took a production door panel and cut it into four equal squares.

                  Then we laid the squares on a flat table but we rotated each square ninety degrees. Looking at each square, you would SWEAR these samples came from different cars.

                  Nope! The were painted by the same guy on the same car.

                  Next, we took samples from a door (painted vertically) and a hood (painted flat) and compared them next to each other. Same thing. You would swear they came from different cars.

                  How cars are sprayed, how they cure (dry), how they fade, how light reflects off of it and many other factors play huge roles in paint color. Those PPG paint samples mean very little and they do not look right. I see several whites with a yellow cast.

                  Bottom line is... you only need to be close. As I look around this room I see many colors on the walls and I KNOW the same paint was used on all four walls. - Dave
                  My latest project:
                  CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                  "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                  --Lee Iacocca

                  From: Royal Oak, Michigan

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                  • #10
                    Bottom line is... you only need to be close.
                    I used to rebuild salvage wrecks in my home shop. My paint distributor scanned the car's paint and every place he put the scanner came up with a different formula! He printed out 7 formulas and took the average. Sunlight is paint's worst enemy and even old paint chips in the books change over the decades.

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                    • #11
                      They are hard to come by but there is a great brochure with all the Tbird color and interior combinations.

                      It has the same cover as the standard 2 page fold-outs that are common although it is about a 13-15 page booklet (can't remember exactly and don't have it with me at the moment).

                      Eric



                      Here are some of the light tan/cream colored cars in the brochure

                      (cover)




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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Joe Johnston View Post
                        ...My paint distributor scanned the car's paint and every place he put the scanner came up with a different formula!..
                        Contours in a car give it 'character' because they also give the color, depth.

                        Look at any of those printed samples. The whole car has no depth. Now, compare that to a picture of a real car. Just take the hood; I see many colors because the contours cause shadows and highlights. It sure doesn't look all one color, and that's exactly what makes us love one car and not another.

                        I'm used to seeing cars with NO paint, all coming out of the Body Shop. They all look 'plain Jane' boring because they're all the same dull steel. My imagination needs to stretch to visualize these as beautiful cars.

                        After Paint, it's a whole different story. Somehow paint gave each one a personality that is different to each person. Some folks love blue, others love red but hate blue, white, black, green, etc. It's all in how YOU perceive colors. - Dave
                        My latest project:
                        CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                        "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                        --Lee Iacocca

                        From: Royal Oak, Michigan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
                          'Color' is one of the hardest thing to match. At Manufacturing Development (Ford) we took a production door panel and cut it into four equal squares.

                          Then we laid the squares on a flat table but we rotated each square ninety degrees. Looking at each square, you would SWEAR these samples came from different cars.

                          Nope! The were painted by the same guy on the same car.

                          Next, we took samples from a door (painted vertically) and a hood (painted flat) and compared them next to each other. Same thing. You would swear they came from different cars.

                          How cars are sprayed, how they cure (dry), how they fade, how light reflects off of it and many other factors play huge roles in paint color. Those PPG paint samples mean very little and they do not look right. I see several whites with a yellow cast.

                          Bottom line is... you only need to be close. As I look around this room I see many colors on the walls and I KNOW the same paint was used on all four walls. - Dave
                          You are totally right Dave. More things that effect the finish result from another part is in what angle it is painted, air pressure, distance etc, etc, etc. We have ( at Volvo ) plenty of difficulties with master samples. They are usually painted on a flat piece, and when we paint wheels, thel look different because it all depends what shape the wheels have. Spokes and so on. When we get a sample of a new wheel and need to judge and approve the paint, we check it against a flat color sample sheet, and even if they passed the pain line AT THE SAME TIME, they look different.
                          sigpic..."Lil darling Ruth"
                          http://www.tbirdregistry.com/#33158

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Anders View Post
                            ...When we get a sample of a new wheel and need to judge and approve the paint, we check it against a flat color sample sheet, and even if they passed the pain line AT THE SAME TIME, they look different.
                            I can understand metal flake 'setting' differently on vertical/horizontal pieces but even solid color paint looks different. The difference isn't as profound, but you can see it.
                            My latest project:
                            CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

                            "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
                            --Lee Iacocca

                            From: Royal Oak, Michigan

                            Comment

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