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Any pointers on sealing a '59 fuel tank?

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  • Any pointers on sealing a '59 fuel tank?

    I finally have some time to try and put my father's '59 Tbird back on the road after a 13 year hiatus. Last time the car was driven was actually by me to my senior prom of high school in which it promptly died. It was towed back to my parents' garage where it has sat ever since.

    A few days ago, I replaced all rubber lines, pulled the fuel tank and took it to a radiator shop to get all the gunk out. Inside looks amazing now. I also bought a jar of Red-Kote to seal up the inside from more rust problems. Has anyone done this, and if so, have any pointers? I'm a little worried about clogging the fuel outlet on the tank.

    Thanks for any advice in advance!

  • #2
    Originally posted by amphiduck View Post
    ...I'm a little worried about clogging the fuel outlet on the tank...
    I am too. Don't do it.

    I had a tank that was FULL of rust (five handfulls). I do not believe in refurbishing any more. The cost of a new tank is WELL WORTH $200. New tanks come with a tin plating inside and out.
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

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    • #3
      I'm with Dave on this one. I replaced everything on my car including the hard line from back to front. Was having fuel delivery problems and "knew" it wasn't the tank because I had it boiled and plasti-coated earlier. Turns out most of the tank sealers are not impervious to the ethanol in gas these days and will peel. Installed a new tank and has been fine since.

      You may get by with it as is - no coating and keeping the tank full. If the car doesn't get driven much though the fuel will absorb moisture and the rusting process will start over again. You'll be somewhere important (like the prom) and be stranded again. Tow bill will be same cost as new tank.

      Good luck,
      Eric

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      • #4
        I just bought a new tank from rockauto $177.00. and I'm very happy i did.

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        • #5
          got my tank from Rock Auto too.

          I also replaced the sending unit, fuel lines, and the fuel pump.

          Donít forget to ground your tank. Your fuel gauge is grounded through your tank.







          VTCI# 11860
          58HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37043 (Sold)

          60HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37252 "Lucille" (Sold)

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          • #6
            Thanks for help everyone! I decided not to coat the inside of the tank and to just mount it up as is. After doing so, I wasn't getting any fuel to the carburetor, so replaced all the rubber lines as well as the steel fuel line (don't ever want to do that again). I then hooked up an electric fuel pump and its getting fuel now, but spraying fuel out of the carburetor like a fountain.

            This car has been sitting for ten years now (in a climate controlled garage), could this be due to a stuck float? It is the factory autolite 4100 carburetor and I'm thinking about tearing into it tomorrow and really cleaning it up.
            Last edited by amphiduck; September 28th, 2012, 02:21 PM.

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            • #7
              If it is spraying gas everywhere, you either have a pin hole in one of your floats, the float level is set too high, or there is debris from the gas tank causing the float needle valve to not seat properly. Also make sure the valve seat is tight and the seat and needle are in good condition and not damaged.
              sigpic

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