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Fuel pump and gas tank question.

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  • #16
    Robert. If you want to save money on the wipers (and a heap of time) try this:

    This fix is for dry seals in the vacuum wiper motor.

    Suck brake fluid up into the wiper vacuum motor. You will have to take the glove box liner out. Put a 2 foot or so tube on the air inlet of the wiper motor and put the other end in a jar with 200 ml of brake fluid (place on passenger foot well). Run engine till all the brake fluid is sucked up and turn off engine straight away. Leave for 3 days. Start up engine and run for a few minutes. Make sure its outside because the brake fluid will go through the intake and through the engine and out the exhaust. Very smokey.

    Anyway. I got this advice from a fellow forum member and it worked like a charm. Wipers work very well. They still slow down a bit when you put your foot to the floor while driving. But this is how they are meant to operate. I think it adds to the Tbird character.


    As for the fuel tank. I bought a new one. Got 2 tennis balls worth of rust from tank. If you really want to use your current tank you could try cleaning it out first. Pull tank. As suggested wash out with a hose. Then add 5 marbles (or same size ball bearings)and a litre of water. Shake tank around for 20 minutes. (this is a good workout. no need to go to gym that day!). Rinse tank. Empty marbles. This will be hard with a tbird tank so ball bearings might be better then you can use a magnet to retrieve them! The marble/ball bearings will dislodge most of the scally crud on the tank walls. This technique works well for motor bike tanks. Good luck
    Last edited by Mickfly70; March 5th, 2012, 12:39 AM.
    Mick Egan Vancouver Island Canada
    60 Tbird

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    • #17
      Originally posted by YellowRose View Post
      Hi Marcelo! My Yellow Rose has had an electric fuel pump on her for the last couple of years and the OEM one and I have not had any problems with that. Mine is located inside the left rear fender area. It is also higher than the tank. Someone posted that it should be. Also, it is a good idea to install a filter in that line coming out of the tank before that electric fuel pump so it can catch anything that might be coming out of that tank.
      With any carbureted car Iíve owned, if the car sat for at least a day, I would need to pump the gas a few times to start the car. Would adding an electric fuel pump eliminate this step? Any noticeable difference in how easy the car starts with an electric pump?


      Is the stock generator able to power the pump sufficiently or should I convert to alternator?


      Iíve read that electric fuel pumps are usually mounted closer to the fuel tank. Whatís the reasoning in mounting it so far away?
      VTCI# 11860
      58HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37043 (Sold)

      60HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37252 "Lucille" (Sold)

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      • #18
        Fuel pump and gas tank question.

        Hi Marcelo, I have not had any problems starting with the electric fuel pump. Since I do not have a generator on Rose I cant answer that question if it will handle an electric fuel pump, but I would think it would. Someone with more knowledge than I will have to answer that one. It did not take me long to make the decision to get that generator off and an alternator put on. I do not know the answer to the last question regarding why the electric fuel pump should be located closer to the gas tank. Someone will though. Also, I saw in another thread that if you put on an electric fuel pump you should take off the mechanical one. No one ever mentioned that to me when they installed my electrical fuel pump.

        Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
        '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
        "It's Hip To Be Square"
        Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

        Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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        • #19
          Originally posted by NYsquarebird58 View Post
          With any carbureted car Iíve owned, if the car sat for at least a day, I would need to pump the gas a few times to start the car. Would adding an electric fuel pump eliminate this step? Any noticeable difference in how easy the car starts with an electric pump?


          Is the stock generator able to power the pump sufficiently or should I convert to alternator?


          Iíve read that electric fuel pumps are usually mounted closer to the fuel tank. Whatís the reasoning in mounting it so far away?
          With my '66 I have to crank the motor over for about ten seconds (normally in two 5-second burst) to draw fuel from the gas-tank to the carb before I can even think about pumping the gas pedal and trying to start it.

          Sometimes another 5-second crank-over is needed to get the gas to the carb if the car hasn't been used for 2-3 weeks (or longer).

          An electric pump would sure negate all this shenanigans.

          And electric pumps don't draw much current, especially modern solid-state one so you generator should be fine.
          A Thunderbirder from the Land of the Long White Cloud.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by scumdog View Post
            With my '66 I have to crank the motor over for about ten seconds (normally in two 5-second burst) to draw fuel from the gas-tank to the carb before I can even think about pumping the gas pedal and trying to start it.

            Sometimes another 5-second crank-over is needed to get the gas to the carb if the car hasn't been used for 2-3 weeks (or longer).

            An electric pump would sure negate all this shenanigans.

            And electric pumps don't draw much current, especially modern solid-state one so you generator should be fine.
            Thatís what I was hoping to hear. I figured that less cranking would mean less wear and tear on the starter and battery.

            Iíve also read that mechanical fuel pump failures can lead to severe engine damage. The rubber diaphragm on the mechanical pump would degrade allowing fuel to enter the block and thin out the oil. Iím sure this is happening more now with the higher content of alcohol present in modern gas.
            VTCI# 11860
            58HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37043 (Sold)

            60HT - Thunderbird Registry Number: 37252 "Lucille" (Sold)

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