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1960 Starter conversion

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  • 1960 Starter conversion

    I recently converted my 1960 Sunliner starter to the 65 style and got the bendix drive from total performance to fit my flywheel. It works great but now I have a slow start condition. The battery drops under 9 volts while starting and was around 12.8 while warmed up and running. I adjusted the regulator up to 13.3v while running. Although, I still donít fully understand the operating principles of the regulator. Iím really not sure if the new starter is the cause or just coincidence that this began when I changed the starter.

  • #2
    That much of a drain is most likely the starter. I assume it's a foreign made part. Remove the starter cable from the solenoid and turn the key to start. Check your voltmeter. If there's no drain then I would assume it's the starter. It's also a good idea to check the ground cable from the battery to the engine as well as the ground from the engine to the firewall. Your solenoid depends on the firewall ground so if that's not good it will affect your starter.

    John
    John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

    Thunderbird Registry #36223
    jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

    http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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    • #3
      Yep got the starter from oriellys. Not sure where I would find a non foreign part these days. Any suggestions? Grounds all look good. Just pulled power cable off the starter and turned the key. Dropped maybe .5v. Bad starter I guess? How much should the starter pull?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Hazegray53 View Post
        How much should the starter pull?
        That all depends on your engine. An older engine with many miles on it will have less compression than a new or newly rebuilt engine and will be much easier to turn. If your engine turns over easily by hand using a socket on the crank then your starter should not struggle to turn it over.

        John
        John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

        Thunderbird Registry #36223
        jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

        Comment

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