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  • Any comment?

    Anyone would like to comment on this "exhaust"
    Why?
    What to check next?
    How to correct?

  • #2
    Its just typical of some crankcase venting blow by. Possibly this photo was taken before the engine was fully warmed up and the moisture is still evaporating too. I'm old enough to remember seeing cars driving down the road really blowing a lot of smoke out from below the engines. Today we are so used to not having any fumes or even a tiny drop of something leak. I would run a compression check and if all cylinders are within 10-15% of each other not worry about it. Perhaps changing to a heavier weight non synthetic oil would help and then consider removing the down draft tube, installing a PCV kit to plumb the fumes into the intake manifold. I'd say its normal for a solid engine with some miles on it.

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    • #3
      If the engine is s till cold, let it warm up. If it still does it when throughly warmed up, then it looks like the engine might need an overhaul as the smoke is blowby indicating bad rings although the smoke would usually be a bluish color
      Midland Park, NJ
      56 TBird, 54 Ford, 48 Ford,

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      • #4
        I checked compression on cylinders and they are all at 120 psi except #8 where I have not been able to take off the spark plug with any wrench combination I had. I will have to do that from beneath but my lift has another car now.
        That is good news I guess. Unless 120 psi is way too low.
        As for the plugs, I have motorcraft BF82C. Is it ok to replace with same?

        Eric

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        • #5
          What is the correct pressure I shall expect in the cylinders?

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          • #6
            120 is not terrible. The important thing is that the readings be within 10% of each other. A new or rebuilt engine would be in the 150-160 range. If it's blue smoke you are seeing most likely it's worn valve seals allowing oil to leak down the valve stem. Has the engine ever been rebuilt?

            John
            John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

            Thunderbird Registry #36223
            jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

            http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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            • #7
              Does it puff a lot of smoke out of the oil filler tube if you take the cap off? The photo gives you the perception that's a lot of blow by. Try to get a compression reading on #8 cylinder. It only takes one bad piston to create a lot of blow by. Also a stuck ring or rings.

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              • #8
                Pressure was consistent and I definitively have to check #8
                No idea of the history of the engine. I Will check the pressure out of filler tube when back home.
                Something else though is the exhausts are spitting black soot like stuff spitting around the exhaust ports

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                • #9
                  Checked today #8 at 120+.
                  I removed the battery tray so this gave me access to the spark plug but even then, the tools were not aligned because of the steering column and I broke the plug

                  However I had another concern on this engine. I noticed black marks on the intake. Noticed it was gas leaking from the carburetor. I saw one drop falling there one time on the left side but this happen on both sides.
                  However the leak is not consistent and I can not source it. Any idea beside checking all connections?
                  Do I have to open the carb and change the gaskets maybe?

                  I mentionned before black soot from the exhausts. Here are some pictures of it. It was recently wipped off oos this is the result of maybe 200 miles only.

                  And guess what? I guess I saw my car on an episode of Wheeler Dealers yesterday when she was living in Florida !
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    The black portions on the intake manifold are caused by the hot exhaust that runs through the manifold, not by a gas leak. The black soot at the bumper is pretty normal although the carb may be a little rich. A little chrome polish usually takes care of this.


                    There is a special intake gasket that has a smaller hole that pretty much eliminates the burnt intake runner.
                    Midland Park, NJ
                    56 TBird, 54 Ford, 48 Ford,

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                    • #11
                      Paul
                      I am surprised as there is only he portion of the intake where the gas leaks on that are burnt. Looked to me like if the gas falling on the hot manifold makes the paint burning??
                      Yes the soot removes easily. I just wanted to know if this was a sign of anything wrong...

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                      • #12
                        It definitely looks like you have a fuel leak. I would get it fixed right away. Gas on a hot intake manifold is a recipe for disaster. It's hard to tell exactly what part of the carburetor is leaking. It could be a worn throttle shaft allowing gas to seep through or it could be a bad needle valve or just worn gaskets. At any rate a complete rebuild is probably a good idea.

                        John
                        John Pizzi - Squarebirds Administrator

                        Thunderbird Registry #36223
                        jopizz@verizon.net 856-779-9695

                        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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                        • #13
                          I see that several of the vendors offer special extra thick carb to manifold gaskets to be used in pairs on 55's so as to act as an insulator. In the photo it appears like a single thin gasket is being used. Perhaps too much heat is getting to the carb causing the fuel to boil out on to the manifold.

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