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1957 Y-block

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  • 1957 Y-block

    How does one know if a '50s Ford engine is a 1955-1957? Later years were coded but were the '50s?

    Thanks

  • #2
    In the US, Ford used Flathead engines in all their cars and trucks up until 1954, when 339 cu.in. Y-block V-8s and Mileage Maker straight 6s came out.

    272 and 292 Y's came out in 1955. No Flatheads.
    312 came out in 1956, then Ford supercharged it in '57.

    In 1958, Ford cars came with Y-blocks but Thunderbird used the new FE and MEL engines exclusively.

    So, especially during the '50's, it wasn't hard to tell the age of any engine. Today, we look back on casting numbers because there were so many revisions and improvements.

    The only engines that were used in '55 thru '57 were Mileage Maker 6s, 292's and possibly some 272's. 312 didn't come around until 1956. I'm going to exclude the Lincoln Y-blocks because they came out in '52 and were totally different engines.
    My latest project:
    CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

    "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
    --Lee Iacocca

    From: Royal Oak, Michigan

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by simplyconnected View Post
      In the US, Ford used Flathead engines in all their cars and trucks up until 1954, when 339 cu.in. Y-block V-8s and Mileage Maker straight 6s came out.

      272 and 292 Y's came out in 1955. No Flatheads.
      312 came out in 1956, then Ford supercharged it in '57.

      In 1958, Ford cars came with Y-blocks but Thunderbird used the new FE and MEL engines exclusively.

      So, especially during the '50's, it wasn't hard to tell the age of any engine. Today, we look back on casting numbers because there were so many revisions and improvements.

      The only engines that were used in '55 thru '57 were Mileage Maker 6s, 292's and possibly some 272's. 312 didn't come around until 1956. I'm going to exclude the Lincoln Y-blocks because they came out in '52 and were totally different engines.
      So, 'numbers matching' wasn't an issue back in 1955-1957? It seems to dictate on classic cars today.

      Comment


      • #4
        1957 Y-Block

        The 1957 Little Bird had five different engine choices for it that year.

        C
        Thunderbird V-8 Conventional Transmission:
        Displacement: 292 CID
        Bore and Stroke: 3.75 x 3.30 in.
        Compression Ratio: 9.10:1
        Brake Horsepower: 212 @ 4500 rpm
        Torque: 297 lbs.-ft. @ 2700 rpm
        Carburetor: Holley 2V

        Optional:
        D
        Thunderbird Special V-8
        Overdrive or Ford-O-Matic Transmission:
        Displacement: 312 CID
        Bore and Stroke: 3.80 x 3.44 in.
        Compression Ratio: 9.7:1
        Brake Horsepower: 245 @ 4500 rpm
        Torque: 332 lbs.-ft. @ 3200 rpm
        Carburetor: Holley 4V

        Optional:
        E
        Thunderbird Super V-8
        All Transmissions:
        Displacement: 312 CID
        Bore and Stroke:3.80 x 3.44 in.
        Compression Ratio: 9.7:1
        Brake Horsepower: 270 @ 4800 rpm
        Torque: 336 lbs.-ft. @ 3400 rpm
        Carburetor: Holley 4V x 2

        Optional: (another E version that was Super V-8 Racing version
        E
        Thunderbird Super V-8—Racing Kit Version
        All Transmissions:
        Displacement: 312 CID
        Bore and Stroke:3.80 x 3.44 in.
        Compression Ratio: 10.0:1
        Brake Horsepower: 285 @ 5200 rpm
        Torque: 343 lbs.-ft. @ 3500 rpm
        Carburetor: Holley 4V x 2

        Optional:
        F
        Thunderbird Special Supercharged V-8
        All Transmissions:
        Displacement: 312 CID
        Bore and Stroke:3.80 x 3.44 in.
        Compression Ratio: 9.7:1
        Brake Horsepower: 300 @ 4800 rpm
        Torque: 340 lbs.-ft. @ 5300 rpm
        Carburetor: Holley 4V with McCulloch Variable Ratio Centrifugal Supercharger

        TRANSMISSION CODE
        TRANSMISSION DESCRIPTION
        1 - Manual

        2 - Overdrive

        3 - Automatic

        Standard: 3-speed Synchromesh with helical gears
        Ratios: 2.32:1 (first); 1.48:1 (second); 1:1 (third); 2.82:1 (reverse)

        Optional Overdrive: Planetary overdrive with planetary gears
        Ratio: 0.70:1
        Cut-In Speed: 27 mph
        Cut-Out Speed: 21 mph

        Optional Automatic: Ford-O-Matic torque converter with planetary gears
        Ratios: 1.48:1 (drive); 2.44:1 (low); 2.0:1 (reverse)

        It is my understanding that Scott has a D Code Special V-8 engine in his '57.

        In 1956, the Little Bird had a M Code 292 as the Standard engine, but it also had 3 P Code 312's as optional engines. In 1955, the only engine offered was a P Code 292. No 312 was listed for 1955. Source: www.automotivemileposts.com

        Are there any stampings on these engines back then that Scott can look for to see which year engine he has in his '57? More than likely, Scott it is a '57 312, but it could also be a '56 312. The Squarebird and other Tbirds have stampings on the block that tell you the year, etc..

        "Numbers Matching" is a whole other ball of wax that I am not going to get into, but others probably are better qualified to talk about..

        Ray Clark - Squarebirds Administrator
        '59 Tbird "The Yellow Rose Of Texas" aka "Tweety Bird"
        "It's Hip To Be Square"
        Thunderbird Registry #33025 VTCI #11178

        Contact me via Private Message for my email address, or (Cell) 210-875-1411 (Home) 210-674-5781

        http://www.squarebirds.org/picture_gallery/TechnicalResourceLibrary/trl.htm

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ss396t6 View Post
          So, 'numbers matching' wasn't an issue back in 1955-1957? It seems to dictate on classic cars today.
          Originally posted by YellowRose View Post
          ..."Numbers Matching" is a whole other ball of wax that I am not going to get into, but others probably are better qualified to talk about..
          That's the question, Ray.
          The answer is, Ford NEVER put VIN numbers on their engines. GM did but not Ford.

          It becomes obvious if you have a 1955 with casting numbers that show ECZ 9425-B, something is wrong because this 4-bbl manifold came out in 1957 as B7A 9424-B. That is the ONLY way to know what year castings were made.

          Here we are some 60 years later, you can see that when components are changed (except for the block), engine serial numbers mean nothing because it is not the same engine any more. Ford simply specified certain cubic inch engines in their specific model year cars and trucks and kept track of the casting number revisions. The casting numbers verify authenticity, service parts or hot rod changes. - Dave
          My latest project:
          CLICK HERE to see my custom hydraulic roller 390 FE build.

          "We've got to pause and ask ourselves: How much clean air do we need?"
          --Lee Iacocca

          From: Royal Oak, Michigan

          Comment


          • #6
            A lot of the cast engine pieces were date coded as well as having engineering numbers (the main casting numbers) Otherwise, there is no "matching" number to the VIN in 50-60's Fords.

            The engineering number usually will signify (such as ECZ) the model year, but there are a number of exceptions to this. Suffix letters also might indicate year, but if there was a mid year change in the part the suffix letter might have changed.

            The four digit number found in the parts and engineering numbers indicate what the part is ( 9425 is an intake manifold for instance).
            Midland Park, NJ
            56 TBird, 54 Ford, 48 Ford,

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