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del
05-07-2017, 11:21 PM
Day 1 -
Cleaned up garage work space
Removed old booster, M/C and firewall bracket from car as one unit
Drill, grind and pound out rivets to separate bracket from old booster
Disassemble and paint bracket
Measure and drill 3/8" holes in 2" square channel for booster side and do preliminary fit
Re-Assemble bracket
Order new firewall grommet for hockey stick "Power Brake Booster Pushrod Seal"
So far, so good...:)

simplyconnected
05-08-2017, 03:33 AM
Lookin' good, Don and I love your pictures. Now, screw your new clevis pin on the new booster and attach it to your top pin in the firewall bracket to find the proper centers for your bracket-to-spacers holes. The booster's input rod should end up in the center of travel.

So, the new booster centers on the top pin but the pedal rod (hockey stick) centers on the middle pin. This raises the booster and pushes it away from the firewall.

To me, firewall work is probably the most 'technical' part of this job. Yes, you need to lay out channels and drill holes, mount everything, etc. The 'tricky' part is in your setup.

Most restorers deal with master cylinders that are 'wet', meaning they have already been previously bled. 'Bench Bleeding' is not known by those mechanics. Also, the car came with a master and booster, already adjusted to each other. Bench bleeding will save a lot of brake fluid if done on your bench vise. It can be done on the car but I don't suggest it. There are a couple methods shown on YouTube. I use the method that requires 'return tubes' to the reservoirs like this one: CLICK HERE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHDn46lbwtM). I use old lines that I cut about 8" long to bench bleed.

The video is quick to say how damaging brake fluid is but they never mention that DOT-3 easily washes away with plain water because it is glycol-based (like your antifreeze). So if brake fluid spills, simply rinse it off.

Boosters & masters that have never been married, must be adjusted per the Shop Manual. I find, every master is a little different and so is the booster. That's why the adjustment 'jack screw' is the booster's output screw.

Your job is coming along nicely and I'm glad you didn't slit your square channels. - Dave

del
05-08-2017, 12:25 PM
Day 2
I'm pretty sure that these springs go on the clevis pin that connects to the hockey stick / push rod, but of course my pictures don't tell me and I don't see them shown in the shop manual. Do they get squeezed in on either side of the push rod in the lever? Should there also be two on the top clevis pin? I have only one...

simplyconnected
05-08-2017, 12:33 PM
Boy, does your setup look sweet...
Del, my pictures don't show 'spring washers' either but if you have room, they could take up any 'slop' that might produce vibration noise. Just make sure you have room, otherwise leave them out. Your pictures of the original setup do not show washers. Also, there is 'some' rust on the original brackets. Those washers are clean.

Could they go to your pedal screw? - Dave

DKheld
05-08-2017, 12:59 PM
Oh boy - another disc conversion !!!!!

(not trying to be sarcastic although it kinda sounds that way - going to be interesting I'm sure)

Always fun to see what parts are used and the progress - thanks for the pics Del.

As for the spring washers mine are on either side of the hockey stick.

Eric

del
05-08-2017, 01:05 PM
They're clean because I cleaned them ;-)
I took alot of tugging to get that lower cotter pin out yesterday, and now that I think about it, those springs were probably pushing out and causing extra sideways pressure on that cotter pin. Once the cotter pin was out and compression released I could see one of the springs still on the clevis pin. The second one had fallen to the floor under the car when the cotter pin released but I never saw it until today...

Moving next to bench bleeding the MC. Regarding that slug for the MC, it goes in flat side first so the concave side is towards the booster, correct?
Boy, does your setup look sweet...
Del, my pictures don't show 'spring washers' either but if you have room, they could take up any 'slop' that might produce vibration noise. Just make sure you have room, otherwise leave them out. Your pictures of the original setup do not show washers. Also, there is 'some' rust on the original brackets. Those washers are clean.

Could they go to your pedal screw? - Dave

simplyconnected
05-08-2017, 01:32 PM
...Regarding that slug for the MC, it goes in flat side first so the concave side is towards the booster, correct?Correct. Think of it as being a 'centering hole' for a manual brake pedal rod. In fact, they leave the puck out if you have manual brakes because OEM masters had a deep hole.

Most masters have a snap ring holding that puck in place. I don't know why the Corvette-style does not.

For bench bleeding, I use a #3 Phillips driver in that hole with the M/C in my vise. Then I put the screwdriver on my belt buckle and rock. It's a lot easier than doing it by hand. Expect about 20 pumps. - Dave

cervantes1m
05-08-2017, 05:02 PM
thank you for posting pics ...It looks great :)

Randy
05-08-2017, 10:12 PM
https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1595/25778181464_b993597a01_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/FgVVfy)DSC02131 (https://flic.kr/p/FgVVfy) by Randy harsha (https://www.flickr.com/photos/126764621@N05/), on Flickr
.................................................. ...........................
I remember Spring on clevis pin, not the best pic. and late to the show :) https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1604/26284650492_0a0414c07e_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/G3FGRb)20160411_142515 (https://flic.kr/p/G3FGRb) by Randy harsha (https://www.flickr.com/photos/126764621@N05/), on Flickr ..........................................

Randy
05-08-2017, 10:27 PM
Hey Del. I cant help but smile at your work its seem just the other day, We (Dave and I) did booster Its was fun learning how to dos ! the satisfaction i got made up for the pain . not to mention learn how to do a hole bunch of outhers stuff met talk to some good old Squares too.you can only see one spring but thers two, it was squshed https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1702/25506107205_36180ec9d2_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ERTt44)20160304_111622 (https://flic.kr/p/ERTt44) by Randy harsha (https://www.flickr.com/photos/126764621@N05/), on Flickr

Randy
05-08-2017, 11:16 PM
https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1586/26580670635_c98a12f999_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/GuQTjK)20160422_113251 (https://flic.kr/p/GuQTjK) by Randy harsha (https://www.flickr.com/photos/126764621@N05/), on Flickr............................................ .......
Del swell posts of yours, someday I'll test this one, soon just brake lines and right side disk.

simplyconnected
05-08-2017, 11:22 PM
Oh boy - another disc conversion !!!!!

(not trying to be sarcastic although it kinda sounds that way - going to be interesting I'm sure)

Always fun to see what parts are used and the progress - thanks for the pics Del...Eric, you were one of the very first that I know, who did a front power disk brake conversion to a Squarebird.

The things we learned from you and your work were priceless. You also chopped our learning curve way down because (if you notice) every disk brake conversion shows slight improvement over the last. That's how it should be and we can't thank you enough for pioneering this huge decision. After all, the parts are not cheap, the work is 'custom fabrication' and we are changing brake lines around as new components are added.

The payoff is beyond, 'great.' I've never heard anyone say they will revert back to drums after installing this retrofit. I kind of keep track of the questions everyone has while doing this work. Oddly, I don't get the same questions.

Randy, I was on the phone with Del and we were talking about how hard it is to separate the upper ball joint. I told him to loosen the nut two turns, back up the spindle with a big hammer and give the other side a big 'smack' with another big hammer and the ball joint stud will fly out without using a separator or a pickle fork. How many whacks did it take you?

Del needs to change his bushings and that's why he's taking the upper ball joint loose.

Del, make sure you have a scissors jack under the lower ball joint when you do this job. Check your upper and lower bumpers too. - Dave

Randy
05-08-2017, 11:57 PM
Big wacks don't play with little ping ping go right for Big WACKS. Mr. #10
...................https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1687/25221088073_ed523144c5_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/EqGEN6)20160316_185159 (https://flic.kr/p/EqGEN6) by Randy harsha (https://www.flickr.com/photos/126764621@N05/), on Flickr

del
05-09-2017, 08:08 AM
Day 2 continued...
Got slowed down trying to adjust the jamb nut for proper MC fit. Removed the booster and ran around to several auto parts stores looking for specialty 8mm and 7mm wrenches with a sharp bend like old school bleeder wrench. Ended up with a crappy set of offset wrenches from Harbor Freight. They weren't going to work either... nuts just too thin. GRind down the 8mm still no dice. This can't be right - what am I missing?? SOS call to Dave D. "Have a helper step on the pedal and you'll have access to the jamb nut!" says Dave. Me - - forehead slap - - DOH!

Anyway having the booster on the bench provided the needed access to get the spring washers back where they belong surrounding the hockey stick. Thanks Eric. After dropping either washers or pin at least 1/2 dozen times finally got everything back in place. It was going to be Mission Impossible with the booster in place.

After reading and watching the vids again decided not to bench bleed the MC until I'm ready to install it for good.

simplyconnected
05-09-2017, 11:51 AM
None of this is heavy work but it does require an 'order of assembly'. If you ever worked on a motorcycle, it's kind of the same. For adjustment trials, you will assemble things a few times.

By all means, mount the firewall bracket, booster, and all the pedal hardware, first. Then I would mount the combination valve because there is still access below the booster. Use this space to run your brake lines to all the wheels.

Now, it's time to adjust the M/C and booster. The booster should be operational from your pedal. If you step on the pedal, your adjustment jack screw and jam nut will stick out of the booster for easy access with common tools.

We have tried several compounds between the booster and master, for the correct jack screw setting. We used putty, PlayDoh, clay, etc. The best one so far is a slice of American cheese (still in the plastic wrapper). A small piece neatly fits, the cheese doesn't get all over, and the result shows nicely through the plastic. Oh, and it removes easily.

You want the output jack screw to just barely move the master cylinder piston. If you go too far, the brakes will never 'reset', allowing fluid to return to the reservoirs because when the pistons are 'at rest' **"the ports should be open to the combination valve." This is a 'trial and error' fitting that normally takes at least a few tries.

When a M/C is 'wet', the piston requires more pedal pressure to move. This becomes evident when you bench bleed. Use this resistance to your advantage while adjusting the booster. You can keep the setup hoses intact or plug the ports during booster setup.

The very last part of 'plumbing' is to connect the M/C lines. Then, the system needs to be bled in the conventional manner.
**"the ports should be open to the combination valve." Use this to your advantage. Since the front valve lines are open to the front calipers, open one or both front caliper bleed screws and wait for gravity to work. The lines will fill, the caliper will fill and eventually brake fluid will come out after air is purged. If you don't want to wait, bleed in the conventional way.

Again, plain tap water will rinse DOT-3 away. If you rinse immediately, no harm will come to paint, animals or plants.

If I didn't mention before, paint your castings before rust can start. I use BBQ (high-temp) paint by Rustoleum, found everywhere at reasonable prices. - Dave

del
05-09-2017, 06:31 PM
Day 3 good progress today... and zero trips to Home Depot, Auto Zone or Harbor Freight!
Adjusted the jamb nut, mounted the PV and had my first flaring and bending experiences. Took a few tries...note the example on the right...nearly perfect! Ooops where's that other fitting??
All jacked up and ready to start the wheel work tomorrow!

simplyconnected
05-09-2017, 07:28 PM
Good job! I see no kinks and everything fits....I like doing brake work because nothing is heavy and the learning curve is very short. By the time you flare your second or third end, 'learning' is in the past...

If you want to practice bending, use the old line since it will be discarded...

...Took a few tries...note the example on the right...nearly perfect! ...

del
05-10-2017, 09:20 PM
Day 4 -
Left side disassembled, cleaned-up
New bearings packed, rear seal installed
Rotor mounted, caliper mounted
Had to grind the caliper, retouched the paint
Right side tomorrow

simplyconnected
05-11-2017, 10:30 AM
Here's an 'inside' tip:
See those two sheet metal 'shoulder tabs' that grab the outer caliper?

http://www.squarebirds.org/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid=13967&stc=1&d=1494465573

An old mechanic taught me to close them up a bit before assembly to eliminate any pad rattle.
The inner pad has a spring that centers on the piston but the outer pad has nothing but those tabs. - Dave

RustyNCa
05-11-2017, 11:59 AM
I'm curious, does it matter which brake circuit the brake light switch is in?

When I did my disc brake conversion, I used the rear circuit for the switch.

Nice job on the lines, I'm not sure mine came out that tidy.

Cheers
Bryan

simplyconnected
05-11-2017, 04:48 PM
The master cylinder delivers the same pressure on both circuits.

I must ask, are you putting the brake switch between the master cylinder and the combination valve? <--this is important.

If so, the answer your question is, no. The brake switch works the same no matter which circuit you use provided it is mounted before the combination valve. - Dave

RustyNCa
05-11-2017, 05:08 PM
The master cylinder delivers the same pressure on both circuits.

I must ask, are you putting the brake switch between the master cylinder and the combination valve? <--this is important.

If so, the answer your question is, no. The brake switch works the same no matter which circuit you use provided it is mounted before the combination valve. - Dave

No I didn't, mine is after the combination valve in the rear brake circuit.

This is an old photo, I've switched to a different master now, but the layout hasn't changed. My switch in in the line right underneath the booster going to the rear brake lines.

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m125/justacog/58TBird/P_00005.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/justacog/media/58TBird/P_00005.jpg.html)

simplyconnected
05-11-2017, 07:04 PM
I always encourage folks to mount the combination valve on the fender apron for a few reasons. The brake light switch is one of them. It simply makes sense to mount the switch in close proximity to where the old switch was because of the wires. The other reason is, to offer more room under the M/C for spark plug and wire maintenance. You need room for your hands and tools.

The rear circuit has reduced pressure after the combination valve. You may want to relocate your switch to one of two places; either just before the combination valve (in either circuit) or use the front circuit because it has full M/C pressure.

BTW, how come you aren't using your electrical connection? - Dave

del
05-12-2017, 08:12 AM
Day 5 ...
A little more grinding on the left caliper, then paint touch up again. Will address further tomorrow if need be.
Removed right side drum and etc. Need to remove upper control arm on this side to replace bad bushing.
Jack under lower ball joint with ever so slight upward pressure, loosen the 7/8" upper ball joint nut a couple turns and a couple of wacks using Dave's double hammer technique up on the spindle and viola the ball joint separated easily! This process was delayed buy a trip to Home Depot when I discovered that my 7/8" socket was nowhere to be found ...
A arm removal was straight forward although next time I would loosen the end bolts first while the unit was still in the car. Local machine shop is doing bushing r/r will be ready Monday. Bumper is shot so will need to get replacement. So looks like this project will last longer than planned. New plan is to be done by Thunderbird Appreciation Day on Sunday 5/21.
Plumbing "roughed in" to right side. Left and rear tomorrow

Dave - Thx for the shoulder tab tip. About the electrical connection for the PV...I don't think we talked about that or best way to handle the vacuum connection?

simplyconnected
05-12-2017, 10:05 AM
...Plumbing "roughed in" to right side. Left and rear tomorrow

Dave - Thx for the shoulder tab tip. About the electrical connection for the PV...I don't think we talked about that or best way to handle the vacuum connection?

Plumbing for the calipers simply goes from the two 'front' ports on the combination valve to the hose clips. Done!

Plumbing for the rear is a bit easier because there is only one line. It starts at the valve and ends at the hose clip above the rear diff.

I thought we discussed whether you got the electrical pigtail (included in the shipment from PJack). The electrical is simple. The valve grounds the wire when there is a fault. So, I use a 'flashing' LED. The wires start with power (from anywhere because it's rarely ever on), it continues through the LED legs and the wire ends at the prop valve pigtail. If the valve spool ever shifts to either side, the LED shines. That's all there is.

The vacuum hose simply starts at the check valve on your booster, it crosses over to your engine and connects to the vacuum line that's already there. If your original vacuum hose is old, replace it.

I consider the work at the wheels and running tubing, easier than doing the firewall bracket and booster adjustment.

When you install your upper bumper, wait until the 'A' arm is installed and the car is on its wheels. If you try putting the bumper in first, the bumper will interfere with the upper ball joint because the suspension is hanging. Do not tighten the 'A' arm bushing bolts until the car is on its wheels.

Questions? - Dave

RustyNCa
05-12-2017, 11:17 AM
I always encourage folks to mount the combination valve on the fender apron for a few reasons. The brake light switch is one of them. It simply makes sense to mount the switch in close proximity to where the old switch was because of the wires. The other reason is, to offer more room under the M/C for spark plug and wire maintenance. You need room for your hands and tools.

The rear circuit has reduced pressure after the combination valve. You may want to relocate your switch to one of two places; either just before the combination valve (in either circuit) or use the front circuit because it has full M/C pressure.

BTW, how come you aren't using your electrical connection? - Dave
It's been a long time since I did the conversion, I think I picked the spot where the switch is now, because that was where the joint was and the wires reached. Never thought about the fact the valve reduces pressure to the rear and might be an issue till I looked at the photos in the thread. The arm the valve is mounted on came with the booster and valve, so I went with it, I do remember seeing where others had mounted the valve on the fender.

The electrical connection is for a warning light switch correct? I never got around to doing anything with it, I see you mention a pigtail for it, I'm pretty sure I didn't get one, which could be another reason I didn't bother doing anything with it.

I wasn't focused on the brakes in this photo, but you can see some of what I ended up with. I clear the tall valve covers by a very narrow margin, but thankfully the direction the engine rotates under load only makes the spacing larger.

Cheers
Bryan

http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m125/justacog/58TBird/th_20170430_182205_zpsckfu3oo1.jpg (http://s103.photobucket.com/user/justacog/media/58TBird/20170430_182205_zpsckfu3oo1.jpg.html)

Randy
05-12-2017, 09:53 PM
This is a much needed refresher class, Thanks to all you Squares.!

del
05-13-2017, 07:56 AM
Day 6
Got a call from machine shop this morning - 'A' arm bushings installed and unit ready for pickup! Sweet!! New bumpers located and on the way - Thanks Carl ~ partsetal. I'm going to assume that the left hand bumper is also shot, so I'll add that to the To Do list.
All plumbing completed.
Last pic is the PV wire. Yes Dave I remember now that we talked about the wire but couldn't recall the hook-up.

del
05-18-2017, 08:20 PM
Family commitments, car club business, return to work...so I got slowed down a tad. Taking the day off tomorrow to round the clubhouse turn!

The right side "A" arm is painted and installed with new ball joint. Caliper has been ground but my wheels are out getting refurbished so can't tell for sure if I'm done with that or not. I did not have a 3/8" allen wrench for my socket set before I started this job but I do now. I would recommend adding to your shopping list if you don't have one and are considering this job. It's used to install the caliper bolts. You can do it with a manual allen key but it is way easier with the socket.

Plan for tomorrow is to bench bleed the M/C, reinstall it, bleed the lines. My wheels are promised Sat morning so I can set her down, install the bumpers and tighten up the A Arm. I can't quite visualize what that bumper install is going to entail jack-wise but hopefully once she's off the jacks it will be obvious?

simplyconnected
05-18-2017, 10:12 PM
...I did not have a 3/8" allen wrench for my socket set before I started this job but I do now. I would recommend adding to your shopping list if you don't have one and are considering this job...I can't quite visualize what that bumper install is going to entail jack-wise but hopefully once she's off the jacks it will be obvious?The job is coming along nicely, Don. Your work looks great.

I don't have an Allen socket set. I keep my tools to a minimum. A regular Allen wrench works just fine for me. If I bought all the 'specialty' tools I'd be broke. Most of them have a unique purpose and great for doing one thing. I do an entire shoe replacement with a pair of 420 Channellocks and a screwdriver. I do have a set of hydraulic line wrenches but I rarely ever use but one wrench, the 7/16"-3/8" size.

Now that you're done with plumbing, how hard was it?

I use blue Loctite on all my brake and caliper bolts.

Yes, when the front suspension is hanging, the upper bumpers should be squeezed, which makes it nearly impossible to assemble ball joint studs. But with the tires on the ground, the upper 'A' arms will reveal room to install the bumpers. When done, you're going to enjoy the suspension and brake performance. Someday, I hope you buy the 1-1/8" front sway bar and one for the rear as well. That skinny 3/4" OEM sway bar is a joke. - Dave

del
05-19-2017, 06:52 AM
>>Now that you're done with plumbing, how hard was it?

I'll let you know after the lines are bled...;)

del
05-21-2017, 06:14 PM
Unfortunately we are rained out here in Buffalo, so our T-Bird Appreciation Day event was cancelled, she's on her wheels and brakes are operational. Got everything buttoned up yesterday afternoon and drove around the neighborhood and stopped 20 or so times. A couple of times hitting hard and easily locking the front wheels. Car does stop effectively but has more pedal free play than I'd like. I may still have some air in the rear lines. Have some new check valve bleeders to install in rears tomorrow.

When I take it for state inspection & front end alignment next week, I will ask the garage "check my work" on the right A Arm and ball joint install.

Friday was not a great day though, gotta say. Bench bleeding the M/C was straight forward and I was feeling good. Those little tubes with a fitting on one end came in handy when I had to re-bleed it after fixing all my leaks! When doing the rear plumbing I had stopped at the 1st union under the driver's seat... bad decision... it is now all new back to the rear rubber hose. Also stripped one of bleeders on the front and broke the needle on the 3/16 flaring tool adapter. And ran out of brake line. Most of the leaks were just needing tightening, but one was a bad flare so needed to remake that piece.

simplyconnected
05-22-2017, 03:33 AM
Sounds like good news to me, Don. I have a few 'helps'...
When your brake pads and shoes are new, they don't work as well until they are 'bedded-in'. So, braking will improve on its own.

Spongy pedal feel can be caused by a few things. Remember, your setup is different. Any loose hardware from the pedal to the M/C will cause flex. Any kind of flex will be felt in the pedal, so watch the booster and master while someone repeatedly stands on the brake pedal. If you see movement, tighten it out.

If the pedal feels like it's too low, that can be from air. Yes, air is a common culprit for most symptoms but it's not alone. If you feel the system is bled properly and the pedal is still low, Examine both booster rods (input and output). The input clevis should travel through the middle of its arc for best response. Then, adjust the output jack screw into the M/C about 1/4-turn more. You don't need to take brake lines off for this, simply take the nuts off the M/C and pull it to the side. When done with the jack screw, re-install the master.

I always encourage everyone to replace ALL their brake lines and rubber hoses. I know we had discussion about this. Since most folks replace the rear hose, it makes sense to re-pipe at least to there. (In Michigan, we can never get that connection apart due to rust so new line is a must for us.) Re-piping the rear axle is easy because the lines are accessible, they connect to a brass tee (which rarely causes trouble) and the lines are short. Even if the lines are frozen solid to the wheel cylinders, they can be cut close to the nut. If a 6-point socket doesn't remove the nut or the bleeder screw is destroyed, a new wheel cylinder only costs a few bucks. I always use Teflon tape on the bleeder screw threads just to keep any water out and to lubricate.

Flaring tool adapter needle broke? I've never heard of that. Return the tool because that isn't a stress point.

Sorry you had one bad flare. A bad flare is normally seen, immediately. If you need more brake line, let me know. For your first rodeo, you did very well. - Dave

del
05-22-2017, 07:02 PM
Thanks for all your helps along the way Dave and to Bryan, Randy, Marcos and Eric for pitching in there too. Would never have attempted this without your help! Two huge thumbs up to all the participants on this site.

These 65 yr old bones are weary...my normal day is spent mostly sitting in front of a computer, so these last two weeks have been something else! I'm pretty sure every muscle in my body has had a workout. Most of the actual work is not that strenuous, but getting up and down from under the car 8 zillion times gives you a renewed appreciation for lifts and pits...

The 'Bird is in the hands of a professional for what will constitute the final tweaking, but happy to report that my squeak is gone so I must have got that A Arm in OK!

Has any else noticed that when you get these cars up on jacks and bang on the front spring you get a an most perfect G chord?

simplyconnected
05-22-2017, 08:49 PM
...The 'Bird is in the hands of a professional for what will constitute the final tweaking...

This makes it sound like the ol' Bird has passed on to a better life...

...yeah, I remember the ol' girl when she looked like this:
http://squarebirds.org/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid=13511&stc=1&d=1483492506

Now, she is in better hands (may she rest in peace).

Don, I'm still a little bit older than you but I don't let a couple back surgeries get in the way of some good ol' wrenching. I feel your pain when it comes to getting up and down so I lay out a nice mat of cardboard, lay out all my parts and tools, then park these old bones in the same spot until that area is DONE. Climbing ladders is the same. I go up one time before each 'break'. BTW, Vicodin and I are very close friends whenever I get a flare up. - Dave

DKheld
05-23-2017, 09:23 AM
That first time stopping with the disc's was great - mine seemed like a different car. Would be out driving mine but the rain won't let up around here. Hope it's a nice sunny day when yours is finished and you get to take it out for a nice long drive.

heh heh "up and down from under the car 8 zillion times" yep - think that is exactly the number of times it took for my disc conversion.

X2 on the cardboard as Dave mentions and I'm going to have to try his teflon trick. The bleeders on the replacement MG calipers are coarse thread and leak when bleeding them. OEM was fine thread - sounds like teflon would be the fix. Had a center pin break on my flaring tool also. Bought a K-Tool after that - big difference (big differece in price too though)

I wouldn't know a G chord if it crept up and bit me in the a...... Oops......I mean .....big toe. :D

Eric

simplyconnected
05-23-2017, 10:12 AM
...I'm going to have to try his teflon trick...You guys in the South have it good. We get salt, which is great for melting snow but then rolling tires produce airborne salt spray. Unless our garages are heated (or the cement floor is insulated with cardboard) the salt migrates everywhere, even if we never take the car out. Salt and water attract each other.

So, our steel brake lines tend to rust shut. To remedy, I do what I can to keep moisture out. For example, I slide the flare nut back and put a couple wraps of Teflon tape on the tubing, then slide the nut over it. I don't get Teflon in the mating surfaces. Then I put some on the threads of the nut. The idea is to keep the space between the nut and brake line filled with Teflon so water cannot enter.

This has worked for me for decades. None of my fittings freeze any more. The worst ones were at hose joints, typically steel against steel, like at a front wheel where the nut is vertical as it connects to the hose. Water goes right in and stays there.

Usually at the first brake job, I do the Teflon trick. - Dave

Yadkin
05-23-2017, 01:16 PM
+1 on the Teflon trick, especially for the bleeder screw. The teflon in the threads keeps the threads sealed enough so when bleeding by vacuum, a lot less air "cheats" through the threads, giving you a false positive of air still in the line.

Instead of tape though, lately I have been using fuel resistant pipe thread sealant.

Yadkin
05-23-2017, 01:21 PM
You guys in the South have it good. We get salt...

I was joking with a client the other day about a product that we've been using to repair leaning/ cracked retaining walls. Before we had this product the repair was a lot more invasive, or expensive, or took up space in a basement. I joked that I like it so much it is #4 on my priority list of what is most important to me, after freedom, family, and cars.

It just occured to me those are also the three reasons I cite for moving South.

simplyconnected
05-23-2017, 02:33 PM
...Instead of tape though, lately I have been using fuel resistant pipe thread sealant.DOT-3 brake fluid isn't fuel. It's glycol-based and washes off with plain water. Regular pipe tape works well. Been doin' it forever because for some odd reason, I have about ten rolls. The stuff is amazing. I watched a Pipefitter make a gland for a valve using the tape. He rolled off a bunch then twisted it into a rope. Worked great and it got me thinking... - Dave

Yadkin
05-23-2017, 04:22 PM
DOT-3 brake fluid isn't fuel. It's glycol-based and washes off with plain water. Regular pipe tape works well. Been doin' it forever because for some odd reason, I have about ten rolls. The stuff is amazing. I watched a Pipefitter make a gland for a valve using the tape. He rolled off a bunch then twisted it into a rope. Worked great and it got me thinking... - Dave

I use fuel resistant because it is a 'one size fits all' solution on my garage shelf, and makes a neater finished assembly than tape.