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Geoffreybusuttilmalta
09-11-2016, 04:48 PM
Hi all .. i d like to know from somebody who already had this issue... I am soon going to rebuild my 352 on my 59 bird.. can i put the engine block in place with all the inner parts installed.. and then continue to add ancillaries to it as it is fitted to both mountings and gearbox ?? Great thanks in anticipation

Yadkin
09-11-2016, 04:53 PM
The factory put it in that way, so yes.

jopizz
09-11-2016, 06:04 PM
I prefer to put the bare block in and then add everything else when it's in the car.

John

simplyconnected
09-11-2016, 10:24 PM
The factory installed the engine AND trans as one unit, complete with all manifolds, starter motor, water pump and pulleys. One man worked from the top and another was in a pit, guiding the tail shaft and motor mounts. They dropped one engine per minute, approaching nearly 500 each shift.

It is MUCH easier and faster to assemble the engine and trans outside the body, then worry about connecting the exhaust pipes and wires afterward. - Dave

Geoffreybusuttilmalta
09-11-2016, 11:47 PM
Hmm cant compare myself to the production line :p ... Dont have such a shop but thanks for the info :) ... Think will installl the bare block and then all the rest will be attached in place .. which sounds more practical to me... Are there any particulwr hints n tips one should follow when doing such re-installation?

simplyconnected
09-12-2016, 05:13 AM
.. i d like to know from somebody who already had this issue...Driveline installation is heavy work that demands good safe equipment, used well within the rated capacities. Don't work alone and take lots of pictures from start to finish. If you start making mistakes, stop. Come back after you are refreshed and well rested.

I'm used to dropping engines into freshly painted engine bays. As such, the paint and metal needs to stay scratch and dent free. The assembly plant uses an operation that I described to ensure the preservation of the body and paint. In short, the less intervention the more likely fewer things can go wrong.

On a sub-assembly line, workers marry the correct engine/trans and they complete a 'final dress'. All the components are totally exposed for easy accessibility and in plain view.

If you are already predisposed with your mind made up, why are you asking for a better or different way to drop your engine? Your method restricts assembly, forcing you to fight the starter motor, exhaust manifold bolts and other component installations as you lean over fenders with heavy cast iron parts. But hey, it's your car to do with as you like. Good luck. - Dave

Geoffreybusuttilmalta
09-12-2016, 06:00 AM
Hmm thats kinda true as well.. no im just trying to seee whats best :)dont feel offended :) i really appreciate your ideass greatly gratefull buddy

jopizz
09-12-2016, 11:03 AM
When I put the block in by itself I put the starter in first. Without the heads in place it's simple. Then I bolt the exhaust manifolds to the heads and put them in next. They are heavy but I've done it that way many times. Next is the intake manifold and then all the ancillaries. Yes, It's easier to bolt everything outside the car and put it in as a unit but since I'm usually doing it by myself I feel I can maneuver the bare block easier than the entire thing. Do whatever you feel more comfortable with.

John

DKheld
09-12-2016, 06:24 PM
My vote is to assemble the engine then install (minus the starter, generator, power steering pump and water pump). I even pulled the engine to repair the exhaust manifolds - but then again I have a lift.

http://media301.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20130518/b_104254.jpg

http://media302.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20130518/b_104321.jpg

http://media301.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20130519/b_140800.jpg

Eric