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chris58
06-29-2014, 06:18 PM
Hi all, I'm currently in the process of restoring a full matching numbers 58. It's a factory raven black, with black & white trim. What are people's thoughts on changing the exterior colors. What sort of dollars are full matching numbers cars worth out of curiosity.
I kind of figure if the cars in primer it's basically a clean canvas to start with.
Just after some opinions. Thanks.
Chris.

jopizz
06-29-2014, 06:34 PM
Since so many were made there's really no price advantage to keeping it the original colors. Black and white were probably the most popular colors made so I would paint it another color that's not so common. A nice two tone would probably increase the value rather than detract from it.

John

chris58
06-29-2014, 06:47 PM
That's what I was thinking, so many made and a common color. Haha you read my mind on the 2 tone.

simplyconnected
06-29-2014, 06:56 PM
How do you get enjoyment from your classic? If you keep it pure stock and keep waxing it in the garage, never taking it out, you will get the most money for it. Jay Leno has many of these original classics.

If your enjoyment comes from cruising around with your family, a pure stock car is too dangerous among modern traffic and it will self destruct because our fuel and oil specifications have changed dramatically. There are no seat belts, radial tires, disk brakes etc...

A classic can be brought up to date but many changes must be done. All of them deviate from 'stock' status.

I suggest you make your classic the way you most enjoy it (however that may be). If the next guy wants to change it, that's up to him. Generally speaking, buying a Squarebird to make money on the restoration is a bad investment. Twenty thousand US dollars goes very quickly into a total restoration. Getting it back might be tricky. - Dave

chris58
06-29-2014, 07:16 PM
I drive my cars, never seen the point of just looking at them in the garage. True the fact about bringing up to standard with safety. I will be installing fully functional seat belts, been looking into disc brake conversions etc. So I'm already going away from standard I guess.
Car won't be getting sold, it's been in the family for a long time, it's just really due for a full rebuild.
I think I'm just answering my own questions haha.
Since majority of the work will be done by myself and some mates keeping it cost effective should be achievable.
It's interesting people's opinions.
As for the investment side of things, I've found over the years cars in general aren't great investments, this will be the third one I've built, more so enjoyment than money making.

simplyconnected
06-29-2014, 08:48 PM
People own classic cars for a host of reasons like, it's the car Mom And Dad brought me home from the hospital in, that's the car Grandpa had in his garage, Dad passed it along, that's the coolest car in the world, product of a divorce, etc. Thank God we all have different taste, otherwise only '32 Coupes and '57 Chevy's would be everywhere.

Most owners have a passion for their classic, so money is necessary but secondary to the enjoyment they get. If you don't share that passion, sell the car to someone who does. Then, buy a car that you have always dreamed of. This kind of passion drives our members to share their baby and their restoration with other Squarebird enthusiasts.

In short, what others think of your passion will most likely be different, but that's a good thing. My neighbor collects WWII Jeeps. Frankly, it's good to see one one the road again. - Dave

Yadkin
06-29-2014, 10:59 PM
Chris, like your 58 my 64 is a family heirloom. Mine also has the original engine, transmission, drive shaft and rear end. Even the distributor is original. I found that the carburetor body was warped so I found a numbers matching replacement, and just changed out that part!

I think "numbers matching" is important, but to a point. I look at this car like an inherited home. The relative that gave it to you shouldn't expect you to live in it with unsafe electrical and plumbing, or decent upgrades. But if you destroy the character by changing a classic Cape to a contemporary I would expect folks to get upset at you.

chris58
06-29-2014, 11:45 PM
It's definitely a tricky one. Unfortunately car wasn't handed down my wife and I actually bought it to help the in laws out financially, I then made the 3600 km round trip to tow it home.
The idea was just to clean up the trim, quick respray and drive it. The problem is that we've now found engine and transmission problems which I havnt had the heart to tell him about.
All the chrome is stuffed so it's basically gone from a quick freshen up to a full rebuild.

Tbird1044
06-30-2014, 03:19 AM
Twenty thousand is a starting point and thiry is probably a whole lot more realistic for a restoration. Look at how many squarebirds are bringing $30K+ and you begin to realize the advantages of building the car to your liking.
As for original color, I'll attach a pic of a car that really caught my eye. I know we all have our own tastes. Mine will never look like this (it will be Corinthian white with red and white interior) but I do like this car.
Nyles

chris58
06-30-2014, 05:25 AM
$30000 probably sounds about right even doing most things myself and Tbird parts aren't easy to come by in oz so most stuff will be from the states.
Out of curiosity what kind of dollars does a reasonable one bring in America.
By the way I love that colour, similar to what I'd been thinking.
I know on my first car I built I probably tipped in 60g and maybe got a third back. The joys of playing with cars.

Yadkin
06-30-2014, 08:56 AM
I think you meant to say engine opportunity. These engines had oiling issues that are easily rectified by a good engine builder.

DKheld
06-30-2014, 09:55 AM
Are stock restorations currently selling good in Australia or is everyone out for a hot rod? When restoring a car to sell that's usually two different groups of buyers and you just have to figure out where the demand is (and by the time you do and get the car restored the buyers will most likely have moved on to something else :rolleyes: ).

Your '58 might be worth more stock when restored if it has options that make it more desirable (for instance - 430ci engine, A/C, less common cloth insert seats, sunroof or possibly the export engine, very low production number, first one imported to Australia etc)

My Dad and Mom bought mine new - I grew up riding in the back seat so lots of memories. They both are gone now and the car belongs to me.
When I decided to put it back on the road I wanted it to be original - rebuilt the drum braking system etc. It was fun but the more modifications I made to it - the more I enjoyed it. Started with Radial tires instead of bias plys, then disc brakes, A/C, and lately a new engine (although I kept the original).

Believe it or not - all my modifications can be reversed so if I ever find a pot of gold I could restore it back to original condition - but then I wouldn't enjoy driving it. Like you said - not much fun to just look at the car sitting in a garage.

I've watched restored originals go for $12 - $25K in the States depending on the year, options and quality of the work - convertibles about 25% more. Haven't seen many modified Squarebirds sold to compare. Did see one in the past with a newer Tbird engine - sold for a lot less than I thought it would. Just never know......

Good luck,
Eric

http://media6.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20100525/b_045327.jpg

RustyNCa
06-30-2014, 03:11 PM
Twenty thousand is a starting point and thiry is probably a whole lot more realistic for a restoration. Look at how many squarebirds are bringing $30K+ and you begin to realize the advantages of building the car to your liking.
As for original color, I'll attach a pic of a car that really caught my eye. I know we all have our own tastes. Mine will never look like this (it will be Corinthian white with red and white interior) but I do like this car.
Nyles
Wow, I would like to see more of this car. The stance, wheel package with the color is done about perfect for my taste anyway.

chris58
06-30-2014, 05:34 PM
DK, I'm not sure to be honest. There's very rarely any for sale. I havnt actually seen a 58 for sale since I've had this one.
I'm actually not going to be selling it, it was more just a curiosity question.
Tbirds aren't very common over here, even at shows etc you'd be lucky to see 4-5, and on all the for sale sites I've found 1 59', it's probably more curiosity as I don't really know the value for insurance purposes.
Yadkin, yeah sorry I too meant opportunity, luckily after searching the net all over the world I managed to stumble across someone 10 minutes from home who actually specializes in fe engines and has for 30 years so he'll be pointing me in the right direction for the build.
Thanks.