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rannugno
09-10-2012, 03:28 PM
I'm a bit worried about a the sound from the engine when accelerating or driving up a hill. It sounds something between ticking and a exhaust leakage. When the engine is idle or run smoothly without acceleration it sounds very nice.
I can't find any exhaust leakage and the power in the engine feels normal. I've also tried to adjust the ignition timing without hearing any difference.
I've also heard other FE engines that have a similar sound. Is this normal? Is something I can do about it? Or do I have to live with it (and stop worrying about it)?

jopizz
09-10-2012, 04:36 PM
Are you sure it's not pinging from using regular gas. That usually will happen when you are going up a hill. Thunderbirds were designed to use the highest octane gas possible so even with the timing retarded it will still probably ping under load.

John

DKheld
09-10-2012, 04:44 PM
Good point John - didn't think about the gas.

I was thinking more along the lines of a problem developing in the heat riser on the passenger side exhaust (on a LHD car). If that spring or the vane comes loose over time it may cause a ticking or rattle type sound.

Hope it is something simple.
Eric

ref pics of the heat riser
http://media6.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20090419/104754.jpg

http://media6.dropshots.com/photos/260234/20090419/104913.jpg

rannugno
09-10-2012, 05:15 PM
Thanks for fast answer:)

DKheld, the heat riser is gone, just a spacer. So that cant be the problem...
But I normally use regular gas (95 octane). I will try using super gas next time (98 octane, highest available in Norway).
The pinging sound is not very hard, but rises when loading the engine until a certain level and then the noise from the engine itself starts cover some of the pinging.
Can pinging from gas harm the engine?

KULTULZ
09-10-2012, 07:42 PM
Can pinging from gas harm the engine?

Yes. You need to recurve the dist and vacuum advance.

rannugno
09-11-2012, 05:25 PM
I've done some more investigating tonight.
When adjusting the ignition advance down to zero, it's possible to hear the pinging when idle. And the pinging is from the top of cylinder one.
I will try to adjust the valve clearance tomorrow. I guess that my 58' don't have hydraulic lifters (I've heard that the early FE didn't have hydraulic lifters)
Is there something else I have to be aware of?

KULTULZ
09-11-2012, 08:21 PM
When adjusting the ignition advance down to zero, it's possible to hear the pinging when idle. And the pinging is from the top of cylinder one.

I will try to adjust the valve clearance tomorrow. I guess that my 58' don't have hydraulic lifters (I've heard that the early FE didn't have hydraulic lifters)

Is there something else I have to be aware of?

Sounds more like a valve-train problem. Look for adequate upper lubrication, weak lifter(s) and bent push-rod(s).

The BIRD 352 was hydraulic.

rannugno
09-13-2012, 04:46 PM
Opened the valve train cover today. Couldn't find anything wrong. No bent rods, the spark plug looks like the others and the valves opens and closes like the others. Guess I have to find an expert on old engines to have a look at it.
I also took a closer look at what I thought was a spacer for the heat riser. It more looks like someone have removed the mechanism inside the riser and replaced it with a bolt onto the holes threw the riser. But I doubt that this bolt may produce this pinging from cylinder one:confused:

jopizz
09-13-2012, 05:58 PM
When you had the valve cover off did you hear a pinging or ticking from the cylinder one valves. If you use a rubber hose like a heater hose you can listen to each valve by holding the hose to your ear and putting the other end near the top of the valve spring. If one of the valves if tapping you can try an oversize push rod. The standard size is 9.56 inches but they sell them 9.59 and up. I found a couple oversize ones in my '59. I believe it came that way from the factory.

John

KULTULZ
09-14-2012, 04:09 AM
Correct. Valve lash on this series engine is accomplished through varying length push rods.

The procedure is described in the appropriate Shop Manual.

Disabling a stuck (or leaking heat) riser valve in this manner was common practice.